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  1. This link was sent to me today, via general forum email from an anonymous email service. Hmm, mysterious! https://www.dropbox.com/s/5mvv8ojzfijx6xf/T7sh.pdf?dl=0 I ran the file thru virus scanner, its legit! Whoever sent this to me, thanks!
    27 points
  2. Good news! I am getting pictures this week and will have the group buy up by the end of the week.
    26 points
  3. We've been working on a production version of the high mount exhaust that's been running on the shop bike since Febraury. The angle is a bit less extreme and a bit less rally bike like. It's got a TIG welded 304 stainless steel "Lobster Back" link pipe and a super-cool mounting set-up that gets rid of the extremely long factory hanger that's prone to bending. It's compatible with the Yamaha OEM pannier racks. We'll be checking it with others as we get closer to launch. No ETA or price for the kit just yet.
    23 points
  4. For the first 7 years, Camel ADV was run out of my house and 20x20' garage. In late Sept this year, I bit the bullet and got commercial space, hired a full-time shipper and full-time welder. Within 2 months we had maxed out that space we and were looking for more. Today, I picked up the keys to a second bay that will increase our space by 2.5x. The second bay is the same layout as the first, no overhead crane but more space. Now, the fun task of getting it geared up for what is looking to be a very busy season! All of our parts sales are way up but T7 parts are leading the charge. Thank you for your ongoing support, we couldn't do this without you!
    23 points
  5. I’ve had my T7 for 3 months but only managed 400 miles so far due to having a new hip and still recovering,so took the opportunity to do some mods ready for when I can start hitting the trails again. I like the look of the standard exhaust system but it’s very prone to damage so I enlisted the help of a good friend with a tig welder and set about cutting and shutting. We cut off the original silencer hanger and welded some brackets on to make it removable and then made a smaller hanger in a new high position( the original can be remounted if wanted ) I bought some 50mm stainless bends off fleebay and my tig welding guru got to grips with the new link pipe. All in all I’m very pleased with the results but time will tell when I get back in the dirt
    21 points
  6. Today I made a "Chain Mate"(R). I basically made it to the minimum & maximum chain tension measurements of 43mm & 48mm. You just slip it between the swing arm & chain at the end of the chain slider where Yamaha states to measure chain tension. Simples. It weighs virtually nothing & can be stored under the seat. You could also drill a hole in one corner & attach a key ring to it if you wanted. This is just the way I'm doing it. Feel free to use whatever dimensions you like.
    20 points
  7. Noticed some thing cool today I haven’t seen posted anywhere. If you remove your passenger peg mounts and are also removing the bobbins next to the passenger seat to fit a rack, the bobbins will fit perfectly where the passenger pegs mount. Conveniently plugging those bolt holes and providing additional tie down locations.
    19 points
  8. Did you get a phone number from the shapely chick?
    19 points
  9. Hi fellow 'tenners' I picked up my tenere 700 last Weds (02/09/20 in English or 09/02/20 in American!). I love the blue wheels of the "ceramic ice" colour scheme but I am less of a fan of the silver-grey flanks. It looks like primer to me - forgot to paint it! Like many others (thanks for the inspiration) I am planning to get some decals to cover the bike, but am keen to minimise the amount of that silver colour showing through between the stickers. To this end I have decided to try my hand at vinyl wrapping! Now, full disclosure, I've no experience of applying vinyls, with the closest thing I've done of late being sticker books for the kids! But why not give it a go? First was the two plastic side panels. These went ok for a first try; albeit you can see a couple of ripples on the edges / corners. Might have another go at these at some point. The really hard bit has been the tank - did my first attempt (well first and second as the first attempt went in the bin) of one side of this today. Again, generally happy with the results. Problem with working outside was that the vinyl picked up a lot more dust and dirt, so there are quite a few blemishes. Need to find someone with a clean shed to work in! (my garage is full of sawdust :/) One piece of advice would be to make a paper template first and use that to cut the vinyl; I did that the second time with much better results. Also I have realised that you can actually see the edge of the wrap from some angles. Admittedly you have to stand quite close to the bike, so I don't know how bothered I am. I do think I'll redo it though: try and reduce dirt and also go all the way to the edge at the bottom of the tank. Anyway; here's a few pics to show the result. Overall I much prefer the black to the silver; albeit I might need to redo some bits. Cost wise, a 1.5m x 1.0m cost about £10 (GBP) - so pretty affordable to have multiple attempts. I'm not even half-way through the sheet yet. Comments / criticism / questions welcome.
    19 points
  10. I am pretty picky about who I have as Vendors on this forum. Many of our vendors have been on our other forums for years with great reviews from our many forums members. We rely upon our members reviews to learn who to and not to do business with. Last winter and spring, many Euro members were talking very well about T7rally.com. The reviews were very good. So, we brought them on as a supporting vendor as on a trial run in June of this year, because we have so many Euro members on this fine forum. Since then, there have been numerous reports of a total lack of communication and customer service, reports of very slow or non exsistant shipments of paid parts and even wose, T7 Rally has never even once posted in their section here on the forum. Because of these facts I have removed T7 Rally from our Supporting Vendor program and have cancelled their invoice for this month. This forum is about riders, bikes and solutions. The members have spoken and I have taken action on this subject. I believe that T7rally is a good company, but probably has minimal staffing and not much time on their hands. I often choose to not order from overseas companies due to distance, shipping and legal restrictions. Supporting Vendors pay the bills for this website, so if you know of a Great vendor that I should bring onto this forum, please send me a pm with their contact info. We only work with companies with great products, pricing and most importantly, great and timely customer service. -Rob AKA Cruzin.
    19 points
  11. I haven't been posting much as I've been busy in the shop with a few new projects. I've gotten countless emails about a T7 Camel Tank, I've been giving non-answers in response. The R&D cycle is LONG for tanks, if I can get one done and to market in 9-10months, I'm doing well. We've been testing the new tank for a month or so and I'm quite happy with the results. It's got all the usual features our tanks do: ultra durable 4mm XLPE, brass inserts (including the filler neck), stainless brackets, tethered billet aluminum fuel cap etc. It's 5L (1.3 gal). It was 8.5L to start but it wasn't going to work with any pannier racks and it was starting to look like a boot. It's a bit strange, as I look at the photos I just took, the tank looks bigger than it is and looks a bit boot-ish too... it looks far more integrated in person. This version is compatible with the OEM Yamaha pannier racks. It's not going to be compatible with all of the pannier systems unfortunately. We've chased that goal with previous tanks and it's maddening. We'll have a list of what hits and what fits as that info becomes available. No firm ETA just yet. Pricing will be in line with our other Camel Tanks.
    18 points
  12. 59 years, 50 of them riding motos. Got the T7 in November, near the end of the season in New England. Getting some more miles now, some good mud, rocks, single track yesterday. 2200 miles. I've owned and ridden a lot of different bikes. Repaired even more. This little Yam is an engineering MARVEL. The transmission some are pissing about works FINE. Is it Rolls Royce silkenly smooth? Nope. Is it positive & easy to use? Yes. The simplicity. One day, you gadget-addicts will be weary of endless gadgetry. And come to appreciate the simplicity of your first dirt bike. The suspension. Much has been written. Like EVERY ENGINEERING DECISION, it's a compromise. Not in a bad way. It's not ready to race, but this isn't a race bike. Like my Triumph Tiger 1050, the suspension works great for it's intended purpose. Remember, the 1,2,3 grand you spend on aftermarket suspension upgrades, is gone forever. Enjoy it, but don't expect much at selling time. Yamaha has hit a HOME RUN by mimicking KTM adventure. Legendary Yamaha reliability at a performance & price point just below Katoom. Every day, I see machinery that was poorly designed, abused, crashed, neglected, repairs attempted by laymen.... This machine makes me smile each time I wring it's neck, bouncing it off the rev-limiter, and roost 2" rocks. "gives a good account" as Dad would say. This bike will take you through hell & back, and be ready for more. Just don't DEgrade with low quality gizmos, and be realistic with what it is. JMWO
    18 points
  13. Made my own skid plate from fibreglass carbon Kevlar. I used the existing bash plate as a template I had an extension of aluminium to protect the rear shock on the existing aluminium plate. I ground down the rivets and used cardboard and plasticine to get the finished shape. I then covered the whole lot with wide masking tape, then used wax and my wife’s hairspray as a release. Layed up one layer of biaxial and 2 layers of carbon Kevlar. Next day I released it from the plug and layed up more biaxial and Kevlar on the inside when this was hard I trimmed everything gave the outside a coat of clear epoxy the inside a coat of grey epoxy paint and sprinkled some paint chips. 2 coats of polyurethane to finish. I had the polyurethane and epoxy paint other than that the cost was less than $100.
    18 points
  14. I've just installed mine! maybe first one in Japan? Looks really cool sounds punchy and easy to install. It took me about an hour with hacksaw. I love that little camel logo on this muffler. I expected there's no logo on it and thought it's a bit empty, so it was happy surprise for me. also thank you for nice stickers and tube cloth thing, IDK whether I am wearing it correctly tho.
    18 points
  15. G'day from Australia on our Fathers day. Last week I paid a deposit on a red and white Tenere, the bike I've been wanting since they were first announced! First I had to sell my TE630 Husky and my Triumph Tiger 1050 to raise the $11,000 I was short of the purchase price. Sold the Husky quickly, and got a couple of interested buyers in the Triumph, so was pretty hopeful of taking delivery this week. So I woke up this morning, and checked my emails as I do most days. Scrolling down to check my Lotto results from last night, I see I've won a prize. Keep scrolling expecting to see I've won 20 bucks or so. Imagine my shock when it turns out I won $11017.00! I was one number away from winning $3,3333,333.00 Happy days, new bike here I come!!
    18 points
  16. Our 1 Finger Clutch kit for the T7 is coming along quite nicely. Anodized 6061 billet aluminum:
    17 points
  17. Here is my version of chain adjustment. It's just my opinion and is not the only way or the best way just what I have found to be simple and quick. The recommended adjustment is 43-48 mm at the center of the chain (between sprockets). The distance is between the chain guide and the top of the chain, when pulled down. I made a simple tool for measuring this distance using a piece of scrap plastic (you can use most any material you have laying around). It is tapered from 40mm to 50mm with a line drawn at the 45mm mark. In the center of the adjustment range. Just slide the tool between the chain and the chain guide till it is snug. If the chain is loose it will go past the designated mark. If it is too tight it won't advance to the desired mark. Adjust accordingly. Since the tool kit does not come with an axle wrench for use in the field I made my own using a 1- 1/16" (same as 27mm) box end wrench from Home Depot ($12.50). I cut off the open end to save space and weight. Not necessary though. Hope this helps someone. ja
    17 points
  18. No big deal, just cover it with a warning sticker.
    17 points
  19. I took Seat Concepts photos from page 24 and re-oriented the photos and grouped the Comfort and Rally seats together for an easier height comparison. The heights are based on the two piece seat foam cover kits from their web site and may not be accurate. I've seen an earlier post that they stated that the low was -1.0 inches lower than stock. Rally seats Comfort seats
    17 points
  20. The T7 is one of the most spoken about bikes out there right now. It might soon achieve cult status! Many people think that all the hype is some huge marketing ploy! Long waiting lists for bikes, sold out hardware (farkle) plus thousands of in depth owners reviews definitely dispels this belief. The T7 is by far one of the most versatile and fun bikes money can buy. I eventually got a chance to spend some time off road with my brand new T7 this weekend. I promised myself to take it easy and bring the bike home in the same condition it left in. Haha! Wishful thinking. This bike just wants you to challenge yourself and see what else you can do with it. We ended up on rocky single tracks, through mud holes and much more. I dropped the bike several times. All on the exhaust side! Nothing broke! The stock can looks like it was used for target practice at a shooting range. The plastic hand guards kind of did their job but will have to be replaced. Handlebars slightly out of alignment! The stock tires are not great in loose stuff and absolutely terrible in mud! Non of this comes close to detracting from the level of fun this bike is off road! Then back on the highway at 80mph without a worry for a cold beer at home!
    17 points
  21. Here is a shot of the low rally seat.
    17 points
  22. Just returned from 6 days in the BC back country with 3 KTM 690's and a Husky 701. Riders ranged from a multiple Baja competitor to a back in the saddle after 22 years. My experience is upper middle of the pack. Did 2800 kms with about 1000 kms of pavement (to get to the good stuff) and the rest forestry trunk roads, forestry service roads, logging roads, quad trails and the occasional no-road breaking trail. Elevation ranges from 500m to 2200m. Trails included loose gravel, sand, water crossings (2-2.5' deep) large rocks and hard pack dirt. Likes: - Power delivery! Hands down - smooth and tractable. Excellent for loose rocks/gravel/sand climbs - Clutch actuation (easily 1 finger) - Riding position - Handling at any speed. Loses it's weight REALLY quickly when doing slow steep climbs/descents - Fuel mileage (consistently 8-11% better than all of them) - Rear brakes (don't really like them on the road, but great in the dirt for modulation or sliding) - Climbing ability - Outex Tubeless system with TPMS - Camel Footpegs - Yamaha engine/fairing guard and Outback panier racks - no bike damage when it went over... - Rally seat - 10+hours per day in the saddle, it was awesome. Dislikes: - My tire selection - Should have had E-09's or similar, not E-07's - Leaking Outex system (likely an installation issue on my part - will figure it out soon) - Weight -If bike is 450lbs with fuel, and had 50lbs of tools/fuel/luggage - heavy to pick up when it fell over... I was worried the 690/701 crowd were going to leave me for dead, but I went everywhere they did except one muddy climb that I attributed to tire selection (spun out). The trails we started on I could have taken my S-10 on, until day 3,4,5 where I wished I had my Wr450. Tight, rocky, off camber, steep quad trails. The Minnie T handled it without fuss, and I wasn't even beat up at the end of the day. Great bike!
    17 points
  23. All right, for all you whiners out there (myself included) who are worried about dropping/losing the gas cap here is my solution. T7 Rally looks to be designing a nice looking hinge kit but I’m a big time DIYer (read: cheap bastard) so for a few cents worth of nylon webbing here goes… Disassemble the gas cap (remove four tiny Allen head machine screws on top of cap). Don’t lose the little leaf spring or the shaft for the keyhole cover. Take a foot of the thinnest webbing you can find (3/4” or 1” wide) and fold the end over twice to make a hump then sew. If you’re no seamstress you could just fray the end and epoxy it into the recess above the keyhole. Tuck your hump into the recess above the keyhole. Reassemble the gas cap – make sure the bow in the leaf spring is pointing up. Don’t overtighten the screws, in particular the front set, as you might crack the plastic with the extra gap made by the webbing. You can attach the tether to that round gas tank mount tube but for a cleaner look there is a perfect slot in the gas tank seam directly between the two plastic pop-rivets securing the front of the plastic tank cover. Pop out the rivets and fish your tether through. You can use a webbing clip like I did or just sew a loop once you’ve got your length figured out. And that’s it. Nice and neat and snug. With this length and stock bar height the cap folds over the bars perfectly during fill-up. If you’ve got bar risers or extra gadgetry on your bars you might want to play around with your tether length. You can see here that the tether does not interfere with the cap seal. Let me know what you think. Would love to see some other design solutions for this common T7 gripe!
    17 points
  24. Got a chance to ride our bike and used the prototype low seat. Really good for a low seat I think.
    17 points
  25. Hi Folks, After a couple drops the exhaust is inching closer and closer to the swingarm. I don’t plan on becoming a better rider fast enough to solve this problem so here’s my mechanical fix (yet to test…). Like an aluminum derailleur hanger on a mountain bike this will bend/re-bend/break before the steel frame mount and can be easily and cheaply replaced (always have a spare and carry with your tools!). This is the stock exhaust but it would work for aftermarket as well. Tools needed: Allen Keys – 4mm, 6mm, 8mm 14mm wrench Drill bits, taps (maybe), bandsaw/hacksaw, file, sander Hammer and starter punch Materials: 2” x 3/16” Aluminum Flat Bar Rivets JB Weld (maybe) First, remove your can. 6mm allen key for the pipe clamp, 8mm allen key and 14mm wrench for the frame hanger bolt. Drill the head off the "strap" rivet and slide that sucker off. You can't remove the rivet completely unless you drill the hole out bigger, it's sandwiched between two layers of the can. You can push it to the side and install a new rivet to cover the hole or just drop a blob of JB Weld on (sand/clean area first). That's what I did. It's hidden on the wheel side of the can and hopefully the JB can handle the heat, we'll see. Next, layout the strap mounting holes on your flat bar. I use a hammer and starter punch before drilling holes. I drilled the two small holes with a 13/64" drill bit and tapped with an M6 x 1.0 tap (welcome to Canada eh, a cultural melting pot where all standards of measurement are accepted). By tapping I can use the existing bolts, if that's not in your wheelhouse find some longer nuts and bolts and through-bolt it! For the large hole any old nut and bolt you've got lying around will do the trick. I found an old M8 to keep things metric. With the strap mounted to your newly drilled and tapped flat bar hold them up to the frame mount on the bike and decide how far apart you want your mounting bolts. I ended up with 2 7/8" center-to-center but you do you. I thought the distance looked long enough to allow for some bending if dropped but not so much that I was stressing the bracket under the weight of the pipe (as I mentioned earlier I haven't tested this yet...). Mark and punch your new mounting hole and clean up the design. I cut my bracket using a bandsaw and finished with a belt sander but a hacksaw, file, and some sand paper would do the trick. Remember, you need two right off the bat - one installed and one on hand to get you home when the first one breaks after too many falls. Its not super pretty but as long as I stick to the same hole spacing I can work on the design as I replace them. Mount everything to check fit then mark a hole for the new strap rivet. You can skip this step if you're still prototyping but I went ahead and committed. You can see the JB in the original hole below. If you're set on your new strap position, drill for a new rivet. There are two layers to the can. I drilled just through the first and used a washer to achieve the proper spacing so the rivet didn't bottom out. I see no problem with drilling through both layers and using a longer rivet but maybe increased exposure to fumes/heat will shorten the lifespan of the rivet, who knows, I'm not a doctor... I've decided to repaint the can with some high heat enamel so I'm not setting the rivet just yet - as is it looks like s%#t with the old rub marks. I'll report back once that's done and give an update as to how the new bracket holds up. If anyone else has tried this or if any engineers out there have some tips I'd love to hear from you! Happy Trails Folks!
    16 points
  26. Just wanted to let you folks now I had an interesting and disappointing situation with my new Tenere. Last week I reached my 600 mile break-in so I changed the oil. The drain plug from the dealership was on really tight. After draining the oil I put the plug back in. I followed the instructions in the service manual which called for 32 ft/lbs of torque. However, I managed the strip the threads and partially squash the strainer cover assembly (the OEM name). Of course, I was surprised and horrified. I rechecked my torque wrench about 10x and it was set to only 30 ft/lbs. Suspecting the wrench failed I checked it against another and it seemed to be okay. I did not "calibrate" the wrench, but merely checked it against the "feel" of another to determine they about the same. I brought the bike to the dealer for repair and explained the story. In the meantime, I checked the torque specs on other motorcycles: KLR650 (17 ft/lbs); Husqvarna 350 (15 ft/lbs); Triumph Tiger (17 ft/lbs). Why does the Tenere call for 32 lbs? Seems like a lot by comparison, even if the bolt is big. I can't send a picture because the bike is in the shop right now. Long story short: Yamaha agreed this was too much torque for this plug, and said they will no longer recommend 32 ft/lbs. Yamaha will cover the cost of the part and the repair, but unfortunately, the part is on backorder with no ETA at this time. Bummer since the riding season is quickly coming to a close. I wanted to warn other Tenere riders to be careful with the plug.
    16 points
  27. So just completed my second run into British Columbia with this group of guys (minus a 690 this year). Our original plan was to run the Okanagan BDR, but since that part of the province is burning up, we decided to head north. Our trip consisted of 6 days, starting in Edmonton, and going through Hinton, Grande Cache, Grande Prairie, Tumbler Ridge, and back. The ride was about 50:50 pavement and gravel, with the gravel being anything from a logging haul road (80’ wide, 120km/h) to a boulder strewn quad trail high in the mountains and everything in between. We slabbed it for a bit, road part of the Grande Cache Death Race route, road quad trails seemingly to nowhere only to find another oasis, climbed numerous mountains and forded some streams/rivers. The Bikes. All the bikes were outfitted with knobbies (the T7 was running Shinko 804/805’s – kinda knobbies), had crash/bash protection and mainly running Mosko Luggage of various specs. The Riders. Riders ranged in age from 51 to 58 with well over 30 years’ experience in off road riding each. We stayed in Hotels, as we are old, and want showers, a good sleep, beer and steaks. The good. The T7, or course! What a tractor! Went up everything I wanted it to, and some things I didn’t! The 2WDW tune with the Camel ADV pipe rocked! This set-up will not disappoint, and not once did I have starting issues even with ambient temps in the low 30’s C. Fuel mileage. The euro bikes were all running accessory tanks, giving them over 21L capacity. I brought along 2 x 1USGal Roto-Pax, but I never touched them. Did one 300km leg consisting of gravel, single/dual track and highway and ran long into reserve. Put in 14.2L to the other’s 16-18L Shinko 804/805’s. So long as it remained dry, these tires worked great. Long lasting, great wear, and good traction on gravel, rocks, shale and pavement. Outex tubeless system with Carud TPMS. Flawless. My modified Outback Motortek/Mosko Moto 25L/RotoPax setup. This system works great for road riding, pavement or gravel giving tons of luggage capacity, low center of gravity, and well over 450kms (if speed is below 110km’h) of range with both RotoPax fitted. You really don’t know they are on there. OSMAnd Android off road GPS. This app kills! Download the maps, input your own GPX files, and ride. Had to of these and 2 Garmin’s and there was no difference in detail. Klim Krios helmet. I’ve been chasing buffeting for months with my Shoei GT-Air on this bike. Nothing with the Krios. The bad. My suspension set-up. I’m running RR’s 35mm fork kit, with .64 springs and a revalved shock with a 9.5 spring, with the sag set perfectly, and while for the road and fast gravel riding it is great, it is WAY too stiff in the rocks. Need more compliance. Dropped my compression damping to minimum, but still too stiff. More work to come, I guess… My Outback Motortek/Mosko Moto 25L/RotoPax setup on single/dual track. With the luggage so far forward due to having the RotoPax mounted on them as well, it doesn’t safely provide enough room for my feet for walking the bike through ruts or foot dabs. These will be up for sale in the near future for a great deal, so someone who doesn’t do single track can enjoy them. Shinko 804/805’s in mud. They offer absolutely NO side traction in mud. Zero! Fuel mileage – crank it up over 110 km/h and watch your fuel range disappear. Was the same for the Euro bikes too, but… The ugly. Always wear a helmet! Got into a particularly tight section where we had to manhandle and walk each bike through a steep/deep wash, when a certain T7 Bark Buster connected with a certain pusher’s head, resulting in a trip to Grande Cache hospital and 7 stitches. Worst part about it was he soaked through his compress riding to the hospital getting blood all over the inside of his helmet! Don’t try to climb a quad trail up the side of a mountain consisting of loose rocks about 5-10inches in diameter, and not make it to the top. While the T7 FEELS like a heavier version of my WR450, when it is sideways on the trail and I’m on the lowside with the bike following, just get out of the way, as it is COMING OVER. I consider myself fairly fit and strong, but I couldn’t hold it upright on this trail. Good thing for soft luggage and bark busters…Skidded it around and got it pointed in the right direction, then spent the next half an hour bull-dogging it down the rocks in +35C heat. Happy to see the highway and vented gear. Anyway, great week away. Never touched the T7, other than to change the UNI pre-filter on day 3. Checked tires, spokes, brakes, chain and everything was good. Very happy again that I ride a T7. The euro bikes couldn’t outrun the T7.
    16 points
  28. We finally got the patent paperwork back for the hanger bracket. We're officially Patent Pending
    16 points
  29. Over last few weeks I've tested 4 different configurations of the fenders on Tenere 700 and in this video I'd like to share my experience with each of the options. Their pros & cons and what did I choose to use on my T7 for the future travels in the end. Chapters: 00:00 Intro 00:15 Why did I upgraded to high fender? 00:49 Two size options of high fender 01:00 Short high fender - Acerbis SuperMoto 01:37 Short high fender - splatter pattern 02:36 Putting back the OEM low fender 03:08 OEM fender - splatter pattern 03:31 OEM fender - the (potential) problems 04:22 OEM fender - different brake lines 05:22 Long high fender - install & experience 07:14 Conclusion & results ---
    16 points
  30. Wow, what a day! European customers, we have heard you loud and clear. We are (now) well aware of the unique need for certified mufflers. Living in North America, this is not the case so it was not front of mind when developing the product. Due to the overwhelming requests for a kit to work with Akrapovic and Wings, this afternoon, we ordered one of each so we can see if there is any way to make them work without designing a new link pipe. Designing a new link pipe is a grind so we'd like to avoid it if possible. However, we will if we have to. That been said, R&D takes time so *if* we do make a new pipe, it won't happen over night. Please be patient. Currently, we are only selling the kit complete. Thanks to everyone who pre-ordered, it's been an incredible day! I truly appreciate all the feedback we get on this forum. Your comments, questions and feedback (good or bad) is extremely useful to me. I LOVE what I do and hope you guys feel the same way about our products.
    16 points
  31. Picked up a T7 recently at a $1500 premium. My other dealer Motoworld wanted a 2k premium. So is life, and supply and demand. Currently have about 400 miles on the clock. I am old but aggressive for my oldness, having a bit of mx racing intermediate class in the olden days. Carlsbad, Saddleback, Perris etc. I beat my bikes up, I bend my rims, I drop them, jump them, and generally hammer them. I also maintain them quite well. Not so much cosmetics but I do keep them mechanically sound. I have a 2011 990 that has gone on about a 50lb diet. Raised to 245mm of highly refined travel, a bit of a bump in horse power and it is a hooligan. It wheelies down the road like a raucous animal and It handles high speed off road with aplomb, I love the bike. It is the blue bike on my website. I have owned the 950 adventure S and the 690 Enduro as well. Have time on the 1090R the Africa twins, a bit of 790R etc as I dial them in for customers. I am going to compare this T7 to the 990 heads up side by side as I do my mods. I ordered a couple items from that Camel guy @Camel ADV and my intent is to make the T7 Better than my 990 adventure. Can I do it against a large WP 50mm shock and 48mm forks with Gobblers? Time will tell and I do not give up easy. So the menu so far: Reduce weight within reason. Increase horsepower within reason as you guys have done. And make the suspension handle everything I can throw at it. Pot holes, getting air, and generally take a flogging, and do it without making the bike ride like a buck board. That is a wagon, horse drawn, for you youngsters out there. So the challenge is getting the suspension on par with 35mm to 45mm less travel. That is the big deal here. The little shock that holds not much oil will only show its size if you go hard on the bike to the point of overheating the shock. Yes go race it and your fluid will be gone at the end of one race. But how many of us are that hard on an adventure bike for any length of time. I can make the action of the shock as good as any with some modifications. How many modifications I do not know but I have some pretty dang happy customers already. I started a thread on another site, but not much interest and should have known better, as the passion for the bike is likely right here. My brother is buying one as well and he will be doing some racing like the Nora and maybe the Virginia City race etc. in the younger old guy 50yr old pro class. That bike will have to be a bit over the top regarding the suspension as we will be competing against Rottweiler and who knows who might pop up for that race. We will see what that entails in a new chapter, but likely will be calling in a favor for some custom parts from the Camel guy as he has some real deal components. If you guys want I am willing to do full build details regarding the suspension allowing you to do some DIY mods. If not no problem I will just post results. Will have to do this post over a bit of time to catch up with where I am, as I have been into this thing several times already. Tomorrow will be yet another prototype Gobbler test for these forks and I am quite optimistic as things are definitely coming along. Thank you for listening, George Suspension101 I love doing suspension and I love motorcycles. Go figure!
    15 points
  32. Big thanks to our very own @TimeMachine for putting this card together. I printed it off and taped it to the top of my toolbox.
    15 points
  33. I AM AN IDIOT!!!! I'm going to chalk it up to being up 20 hrs. yesterday. To all of those who said check the front tire is on right--- you win the prize! After a good sleep, I wondered in to the garage, looked down, and realized the front wheel was indeed on backwards! I could have sworn it was right the night before. The reluctor ring was on the right side of the bike. I went through my stash of tools and only had a 17mm hex. I even tried to rig something to get the front axle off. No luck, A 20 mile drive to the local Harbor Fraught was a success, but a costly one. They didn't have a solo 19mm hex, but there was one in one of their ICON tool sets. $43.00 later, I went home a complete hex drive set all for just the 19mm. Tire flipped, bolts torqued, and voila!!!! All is good in the world again. Thank you to all who replied on this post! When things are awry, the support of the posters make everything seem less worse. I just laid down 80 miles this morning and cannot wait until she's broken in. Thank you all again, happy trails, and keep the sticky side down. P.S>- I am still going to follow up with the dealership and insist they reimburse me for the tools and I'm also asking for a credit equivalent to the shop time that would have been billed if performed at a shop.
    15 points
  34. Thought I’d do a bit of a write up here documenting the trip I just wrapped up. Purchased my Tenere in January and managed to put just enough miles on to do the first service before leaving on this adventure... Chicago to the Ozark Mountains National Forest and then to the Mark Twain National Forest and then back home. 7 days, 5 guys- good times! We had a pretty solid plan and several .GPX tracks ready to go (I’ll share if anyone is interested) Day one was the longest day (lots of pavement between Chicago and our first camping stop- about 2 hours south of Saint Louis) 480 miles total- and the T7 impressed the hell out of me. Stock seat, I felt fine after that long day. The next 5 days were a mix of mountain roads and lots and lots of dirt/gravel forest service roads. Heavy rains a few days earlier made sure that the river crossings were interesting (to say the least) and the steep climbs and descents were rutted and washed out. FUN TIMES! This being my first proper off-road trip with the T- I wasn’t sure what to expect from a 430lb bike with 40lbs of gear strapped to it... BLOWN AWAY This thing rules. I’m a pretty harsh critic of big bikes that claim to have real off road chops- but this thing is the real deal!! My dirt ride is a Beta 300rr- and while I’d pick the Beta 10 times out of 10 for riding tight and technical trails- this Yamaha absolutely shines in the 2-track and dirt roads... I was blazing at speeds the Beta wouldn’t have tolerated, and with such a flexible motor I was barely shifting... 4th gear just ripping, rear tire stepping out perfectly around the gravel corners, carrying speed that truly amazed me. I wish I would have swapped the front STR (rear was swapped for a tractionator adv) as the front end could have used a little more bite- but wagging the bikes tail was so easy and controllable that it didn’t slow me down much. Climbs like a billy goat! 2nd gear got me up the gnarliest rocky hills and wheel spin was so easy to control! Want some? Twist your right wrist. This thing just tractors forward. I don’t know what all the suspension complaining is about... felt plenty competent with just a few extra clicks of compression front and rear- never bottomed, offered a pretty nice compliant ride in my book. I wasn’t jumping, but for me... why would anyone jump this bike? Not sure what else to say... I love it. I’ll list the mods just in case anyone has questions- Camel high fender Camel footpegs Camel tail tidy Camel one finger clutch arm Camel high-mount exhaust Camel anti-bobble head Camel flasher relay Cheapo eBay turn signals Tusk skidplate Rally Raid pannier racks ADV Spec crash bars Barkbusters JET handguards Renthal CR-High Bend bars Adjustable windscreen brackets MotoZ Tractionator ADV rear Giant Loop Mototrekker panniers
    15 points
  35. I just had a talk with my sales staff and cleared this up. Yes, we are going to be making a complete seat option and it will be for the 1 piece design only. Here is a pic of the sample production base.
    15 points
  36. We have approved our new 1 piece pan and it is going into tooling production. Here is the prototype
    15 points
  37. The new seats are coming along nicely. Once the low, standard and rear kits are available I will run a group buy. I will also post pictures as they come available.
    15 points
  38. Hi from Italy, it seems that ACERBIS is working on a bigger plastic tank of 23 lt (around 6 gal). It weights 1.5 kg less than the OEM. No internal anti-shaking walls. It will have a screw cap, but in option available with key. In store for the end of June... I found those info on an italian forum. So consider them as rumors, but we have a photo !
    14 points
  39. Hello chaps, after long wait and prioritising other stuff I've now managed to fit and test ride the healtech quickshifter. The quality of the electronic package is amazing and everything is made very well, all connectors are solid very robust and the manuals are easy to understand. True plug and play kit with no problems whatsoever... I would recommend this and I regret not doing this mod earlier.. Installation was very easy and I will create a thread on how to install with pictures. After installing, you connect to an app and calibrate the system to work with the engine and you test the cut off for the engine. First impressions after the test ride... Very very very smooth and so much fun, I have owned bikes with quickshifters before and knew what to expect but coupled with this engine and the transmission of the T7 its just amazing, setup on auto learning at the moment and it works very well, all the changes above 3.5k rpm are good and as soon as you pas 6k 7k rpm they are instant and very fast. Overall I would highly recommend this mod to anyone as it make the ride so much more fun, exiting corners with half or full throttle and up shifting one gear after another is just brap brap brap brap Cost and delivery : I've bought from ebay for 259.99 and I think its worth every penny. Regards, Aleks
    14 points
  40. Had quite a long ride on motorway yesterday and found that my big GPS (Garmin 276Cx) seems to shake from side to side quite a lot. So I made a bracket to link it to the main instrument bracket. I got the idea from the one that Donner Tech make, but mine is just made from 2.5mm aluminium cut and bent. It seems to work great.
    14 points
  41. Asking the question is answering another. If you have the skills and experience, you know what you want and need for your style of riding, then you look for experiences from people who ride similarly as yourself and purchase something that seems promising based on those things. That gives you the experience for the next time. If you have to ask what "the best tires" are: the stock Pirelli's will be fine for you. No disrespect meant to the OP, but I'm getting slightly fed up with the mindless focus on "the best", "professional" and the like. The internet nowadays consists of people trying to sell you something you don't need, or buy/spend more than you have to. Don't fall into the trap thinking better or "professional" equipment makes you a better rider. Spoiler: it doesn't. Riding and actively working on your skills makes you a better rider. And for accessories: if it works, it's good enough. If you think you need the best, they've gotten into your head and you've become the compliant consumer they want you to be. Although I like this forum, 90% is about stuff to be bought to make the bike "better", a significant part by people who have never actually ridden the bike, but already decided that it's not good enough. Really? Just ride. PS: don't think for a moment that I do not read reviews to see what's best or that I don't buy stuff that's too expensive and that I actually don't need. I fall well inside the demographic of men with disposable income and foster the illusion that I am far more of an adventurer instead of the wimpy desk-hugger that I actually am.
    14 points
  42. This is my solution in order to protect the exhaust and mount panniers closer to the bike.
    14 points
  43. My good friend and regular riding parter Jaden suggested we race a hare scramble on our T7s. We entered the Gloomy Creek Hare Scramble a couple of weeks ago and raced in the Sportsman B class, which is pretty mellow. I've done some desert races but this was my first woods race (on any bike) so the Sportsmen class was good for a first attempt. Jaden has a bunch of hare scramble and X-Country races under is belt (on an actual enduro bike). The Pro/A/B groups had a two hour time limit, most laps the time window wins. Our C group was on a modified course, one hour time limit. Some of the women's classes are in the C group as well as Sportsman and Vintage. The C loop had some tight woods sections, open ATV track and 9 large water crossings per lap. There was very little elevation change on the course, unfortunately. There were 8 people in our class with the usual 250/300 2T bikes being well represented as well as a guy in an XR400(?) and a KX 4T. We were getting lots of weird looks from spectators. The lap tracking/time keeping is done with RFID stickers and a sensor at the start/finish line. I didn't realize until after the race that my tag wasn't registering. We finished the race and went back to the van to get changed and packed up. When we got back to the stage/registration area, I saw the results page with the DNF and I missed the protest period so officially a DNF despite getting 6 laps in. I'll keep a better eye on the results sheet sooner next time, live and learn. There should be more photos to come. They had photographers all through the woods, I just need to track down their pics. It was 34C (93F) and very hazy due to the large number of forest fires burning in neighboring British Columbia. You can see the haze in the photo below (taken at noon).
    13 points
  44. Tonight i finally got my new Dunlop Trailmax Mission tires mounted up on my T7. i can honestly say that i didnt expect that big of difference over my 2000 km old pirelli STR. but all i can say is They transformed the bike. Now its smooth as silk on the tarmac. gone is the headlight vibration that were present in 55 mph or 90 km/h. They are also very quiet in comparsion! But the biggest difference was on gravel. Before with the STR the front wheel wanted to slide away with a sketchy feel in the handlebar. Slippery and almost scary. this times different! i was entering the side and middle strip of loose gravel and it felt like i had knobbies. i was suprised how well these missions hooked up and provided a Very nice feel of control and comfidence. Even on loose surface! rear tire provide a real good bite too being a plus 200 kg bike and weight somtimes shows, This tires is what i feel should had come as standard. NOW what a fun bike to ride! i can Highly Recommend this tires to you that want the best of both worlds.! //Richard
    13 points
  45. A short while ago I had the misfortune of dropping my bike on a lonely bush track in an area where I knew there would be no help to be had and therefore the task of lifting the bike was all up to me and me alone. If it had of been 20 odd years ago this would have not been a problem but now at 70 I have to admit I struggled a lot with it but I eventually got it up on its feet although my feet were ready to give out. I looked at the MotoBikeJack from the States which was going to cost over $300 plus postage I estimated combined price would be over $400Au, but the price became academic as they are no longer available. So long story short I decided to make my own. The first one I made was a bit flimsy but the idea was heading in the right direction. The second which was constructed a lot stronger worked well but needed a bit of finessing for it to be portable. 2nd attempt. . Version three is now complete it has a maximum length of 320mm weight is just under 3kg. My reason for posting this is to show that for us older riders this removes the lifting problem and if anyone is interested in making their own I can give you a step by step program on how to make your own. All you need is minimal welding skills and a bit of time. 3rd effort. I no longer worry about heading out on my own again as now I am confident that if I drop the bugger I can get it back up with minimal effort. Cheers all. Allen
    13 points
  46. Now that I have 1031 miles on my Ténéré 700, I feel barely qualified to compare it to my 2008 WR250R and 2012 Super Ténéré. If I had to sum it up in one sentence, I would say that the T7 feels more like an "all-grown-up" WR250R rather than a downsized S10. To put this comparison in some context, I have 26K miles on the WR and 79K miles on the S10, both bought new - commuting, touring, and boondocking. To be fair, the WR & S10 have gained tuned suspension and ergonomic changes (bars, pegs, seats, windscreens) to suit my riding style and fit me. The T7 still feels like Mr. Yamaha's bike. That's not a complaint by any means. Pretty darned good good out of the box, just that at 1K miles, I haven't fully gelled with it yet whereas the siblings are like old boots - they fit perfectly and I know exactly how they're going to behave in every circumstance. For the sake of structure, I'll pick on a few categories in which to make comparisons. Ergonomics: The T7 fits me well and was immediately comfortable and intuitive to ride. The seat and windscreen will probably get some attention in the future but they're pretty low priority for now. For reference, I measure 6' tall, 34" inseam, 160lbs. weight. Clutch: The clutch is one of my points of contention on the T7 because I find the friction zone quite narrow. I'm behind the learning curve on this aspect of control. Honestly, the WR is worse but on the WR I swapped in a Righteous Stunt Metal lever for better feel and the 23 horsepower rarely overpowers sloppy clutch work. The S10 has a hydraulic clutch and it's a thing of beauty, far more precise in low-speed maneuvers. Transmission: T7 - snickity-slick. I've seem some complaints about shifting but mine is faultless. The WR tranny is the best I've ever ridden, again probably pretty forgiving behind all the 250cc horsepower. No complaints about the S10. If I ever miss a gear, it's my fault. Trannies always seem to feel better after an oil change. Suspension: It would be unfair to compare to custom tuned suspensions on other bikes. I will say that I appreciate the T7's fore and aft dampening adjustability. The S10 gets the win here for also having fork preload adjustment. I put the settings to factory spec (middling) and will take my time and take notes as I make adjustments. No complaints so far. Power/Drivetrain: The S10 has shaft drive and I dig that - appropriate for that bike, not appropriate for the T7. Some people have complained of "snatchy throttle" on the T7. I don't see it. Maybe they haven't ridden a WR250R ~ the gold standard for throttle snatchiness. (<-- new vocabulary word). T7 power feels just like the dyno chart looks - smoothly increasing power from low revs and very flat torque curve. Lot's of people want more power, I'd settle for more skill to better use the available power. Rider Aids: WR don't gottem' - no ABS, no ride modes, no traction control - not needed on a 250. S10 has 2 ride modes, can't decide which to use, 3 traction control modes - would be happy if it was just in the middle all the time, ABS cannot be "user" disabled - sometimes sucks to not be able lock the rear wheel in the dirt, scary even. T7 - lack of ride modes, lack of traction control, and having switchable ABS are big selling points. I contemplated the KTM 790R but knew I would forever be agonizing over whether I was in the right modes. Call me a simpleton but I like the T7 mantra - "I am bike, ride me". Ride: The WR is geared down to make the most of its miniscule HP. The racy little motor does yeoman's duty on the highway but I feel bad for wringing its neck. The S10 has more frontal area producing a bigger "rider bubble" and there is something to be said for 1200cc's. The T7 just doesn't care - highway, streets, dirt roads - bring it on. To conclude for now, each bike has a special place. The WR250R is an absolute gem that I will ride places where the T7's weight is prohibitive for my bike-picking-up ability. The Super Ténéré is uncannily capable. It is amazingly well composed on tracks it has no business being on, especially while fully-loaded and 2-up, then blasts down an 80-MPH highway without breaking a sweat. The T7's CP2 motor makes highways a non-issue and it's chassis yearns for rough roads. This bike will comfortably take me everywhere I need to go and nearly everywhere I want to go (at least solo). It's still early-days with this one and I'm jazzed about that! Not the most well-composed picture but the T7 got me where I wanted to be today - in the mountains, off the tarmac, hundreds of miles from home. Job done.
    13 points
  47. We're 95% set-up in the new shop and finally working on projects again. The Camel Tank is VERY close!
    13 points
  48. I drilled holes in a set of aluminum Motion pro bead breakers and mounted them where the passenger pegs go. They double as a lash down point for my soft luggage.
    13 points
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