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  1. 59 years, 50 of them riding motos. Got the T7 in November, near the end of the season in New England. Getting some more miles now, some good mud, rocks, single track yesterday. 2200 miles. I've owned and ridden a lot of different bikes. Repaired even more. This little Yam is an engineering MARVEL. The transmission some are pissing about works FINE. Is it Rolls Royce silkenly smooth? Nope. Is it positive & easy to use? Yes. The simplicity. One day, you gadget-addicts will be weary of endless gadgetry. And come to appreciate the simplicity of your first dirt bike. The suspension. Much has been written. Like EVERY ENGINEERING DECISION, it's a compromise. Not in a bad way. It's not ready to race, but this isn't a race bike. Like my Triumph Tiger 1050, the suspension works great for it's intended purpose. Remember, the 1,2,3 grand you spend on aftermarket suspension upgrades, is gone forever. Enjoy it, but don't expect much at selling time. Yamaha has hit a HOME RUN by mimicking KTM adventure. Legendary Yamaha reliability at a performance & price point just below Katoom. Every day, I see machinery that was poorly designed, abused, crashed, neglected, repairs attempted by laymen.... This machine makes me smile each time I wring it's neck, bouncing it off the rev-limiter, and roost 2" rocks. "gives a good acount" as Dad would say. This bike will take you through hell & back, and be ready for more. Just don't DEgrade with low quality gizmos, and be realistic with what it is. JMWO
    14 points
  2. After taking a year off of roaming around in the Summer in the Rockies, I opted to do so on a newly acquired T7. I grabbed these maps and set no agenda: I parked my truck near Montrose, CO, (after playing on a 525 near Taylor Reservoir) and pulled out the T7 to wander around on the COBDR and some tarmac roads. I didn't have the chance to pack the bike while at home, so it was a mish mash of strapping things on the bike at the last moment from a box filled with quick grabs from the garage.....and when I was a thousand miles from home.... on the trip (silly plan :). I also had been riding on a 525, so merging the gear from 1 bike to both bikes also demonstrated some disfunctionality! Also contributing to the poor prep was that I had gotten a plethora of parts for the bike from Poland and England, etc... in the last couple weeks, so had yet to figure that out! Regardless....... The bike ran FANTASTIC! The Peonia to Carbondale hiway was beautiful: I wandered up to Aspen and then backtracked to Basalt to start the BDR on the Alternate route given the fire in Sylvan. The Alternate route was great! I liked every after-market product I installed!! It is interesting that as a newbie.... you could innocently buy your single first accessory, and because of that purchase, there are restrictions and parameters you have to figure out to have some compatibility for future purchases!! I bought the Tusk tail rack, and then the adv spec side racks to specifically protect my paint for my rackless luggage (maybe not rackless after all)- haha. My XL Enduristan Blizzard bags looked to have the same shape and size as the ADV spec racks.... almost They were great! (Also, Yamaha center stand, Camel finger clutch pull easy, oxford heat grips, barkbusters, double take mirrors, Camel anti-wobble odometer bars, rally seat (but hasn't showed up yet), Heed uppers, alt-rider headlight shield) My biggest change for my next ride would be to be better prepared in my packing so I didn't look like the "grapes of wrath" truck going down the hiway , but even with that funkyness, the bike rode super. In the left Enduristan pannier was only a sleeping bag and mini pillow. In the right pannier was a stove, pots, food, water purifier, bowl, cup. In the bag immediately behind me, strategically set at a height that allowed me to rest my backpack/hydration pack on it to reduce any weight on my shoulders, was tools, tubes, air compressor, and some mini emergency accessories (the heaviest bag at 19 lbs because of tools) In the tail bag strapped on top of the left pannier, used like a tank bag (but I don't like tank bags), was toiletries, chargers, snacks, etc... In the yellow bag on top of right pannier was rain gear for easy quick access, and an insulating jacket if it got below 50 degrees (only did once). In fact, purposefully, I did not wear my Klim Gortex jacket as I thought it would be too warm/hot, so I used a mesh jacket the entire time except for a few thundershowers when I quickly slipped on the gortex shell over the mesh jacket for an hour or 2. It was the right choice! The Blizzard bags had lots of places to attach straps for extra stuff, so that was great! In the big red Monster bag was my tent, sleeping pad, camp chair and misc clothes when camping (18 lbs., so tried to slide it up over seat a bit to keep total weight off tail rack ) Strapped on top of the big red bag was 2 gas tanks, and a Bike cover (I find that I feel like less folks see the strapped on bags and bike when covered in random towns and keeps Bozos from wanting to sit on the bike when along the sidewalk unattended, does make me miss hard panniers, but I wanted to go soft luggage on this bike). Also on top of monster red bag is an easy quick access cable lock that I use to thread through my helmet, one pant leg, and one arm sleeve of jacket when bike is unattended while I grab a bite to eat). My newly installed PUIG windshield was truly incredible! ( I have a vstrom and won the wind battle with 7-9 extra purchases/decisions, but this bike only needed one. The original stock screen had the wind force hit me forcefully on my upper lip. Frankly, it was horrible as I couldn't even partially open a face shield as the wind force would close it once going about 45 mph, and the mixed air was so violent that no pair of glasses would even stay still on the bridge of my nose! But this new Puig was about ~4" taller. If you would have seen the massive bug splatters at the top of that screen, you would realized how much protection it gave, and over 95% of the thousand+ miles I rode, it was with the face shield up with only prescription glasses on, and almost no bug hits nor glasses movements. I did use the drop down sun shield occasionally to cut glare and have a bit more protection, but that was also to have good wind flow and cool down as that Shoei GT was a road helmet and a bit warm for adventure riding. I am gonna shop for a new helmet soon. (By the way, this wind story and fairing info: I have the stock seat, am 6-1 and buy 34 inseam jeans - I liked the set-up I have for 3 mph or 95 mph.). Back to the ride...... At the end of the BDR, I met a couple fellas on Suzuki 650's who had a left a fella back in Gypsum with his triumph and a burned out clutch, so they were going to turn around and head back on the BDR. Regardless, that wasn't my goal given that I was on a bike that seemed to enjoy tarmac at 80+ mph. I am a bit shocked that given how many COBDR stories I have read, nobody really talks about good routes for the return after a BDR. Sure, there are the long painful drones of riding the knobs back to the start point, but for the COBDR, if on a big adventure bike, I found a great option! At the end of the BDR, in the late evening, I turned North-East on the Hiway 70 in Wyoming. For almost 45 minutes, I did not catch a car, nor pass a car, as I rode at a vey high rate of speed up and over another spectacular pass through absolutely fantastic winding curves towards Medicine Bow. It was a spectacular ride as I cruised into the Encampment/Riverside towns. It was just about dark, so I considered a dive into the trees to pirate camp. But I saw a cozy clean RV park and thought about a campsite (Often the RV parks are not into tent campers, but at Lazy Acres, a super kind fella walked up to me and asked me if I needed help. I asked if he could be so kind as to allow me to use a small patch of grass and he smiled and said, "Of course" So for $12, I was offered a nice soft grass patch and a picnic table. Showers too! Jack pot - what a lucky dude! The next morning I cruised up to the 130 to go through Medicine Bow, Nice: A drop down to the prairies to Laramie, then a lousy dangerous road to Fort Collins where wackos tried to pass unsafely. It was hot and crowded in Fort Collins, and the Rocky Mountain National Park offered a window of time to enter if registered, so instead, I took the 14 back up into the High Country. It is a nice road, and then I used the Gould-Rand dirt Cut-over. Super nice to have the road to myself and some moose not far away: A cruise on the Hiway 40 to the Interstate 7, with some pretty good pace up and through Eisenhower tunnel, and then over to Leadville. I really like Hagerman Pass to get back to Basalt, but I also think that Independence pass from the East is one of my favorite, so I opted for the Twin Lakes entry point: The spot just under the Pass is also a nice place to reflect on the beauty of that route: I then took the (82) back to Carbondale and the Peonia hiway (133), as it was so dang nice. A bit hot headed to Delta and Montrose, but all good It was a super loop and I look forward to doing it again! Safe Travels to you all. Mac.
    7 points
  3. I'm happy to announce we now have a drop-in spark arrestor for the exhaust kit. We couldn't find anything suitable off-the-shelf do we had to have them custom made. They are on the website and ready to ship. https://camel-adv.com/collections/yamaha/products/51mm-od-spark-arrestor
    6 points
  4. I put up a couple YouTube videos of me riding some singletrack. I will be adding to it farely regularly.
    6 points
  5. Wow, the Basin is Big and Barren. I'm wondering if the eventual WYBDR will go through it. Rode 1,100 miles from Boulder, CO to Union Pass across the Wind River Range and back, crossing the Basin twice. The way North I went Bar X road and Oregon Buttes, and the way back went more easterly through South Pass City (ghost town), to Sweetwater Bridge and eventually Mineral X Road. Saw some good sites (South Pass City is a great stop!), and mostly easy roads, but very hot temperatures (90s) and too much wildfire smoke. I'm worried here in the Western USA that wildfire smoke-filled summers are our new normal. Scary. Drove through the big Colorado Cameron Peak fire area from last summer getting to WY, and the terrain is apocalyptic. Union Pass was an easy dirt road and not super interesting. Enjoyed FS300 Louis Lake Rd SW of Lander and camping there more. That's a nice area to see. Also an easy dirt road. Some exploring along the Lander Cuttoff road to Pinedale was fun. Across the Basin you will hit some sand, silt, and slightly more challenging riding. Took me 3 hours to get across, running from 20-40 MPH. My T7 got in the 60s MPG the whole trip. From Lander to Rawlings across the basin I got 68 MPG. That's with pretty big camping load. Love it - and the bike!!
    5 points
  6. Thank you so much all for the kind messages and responses. I need to learn more from your experience. Hope this topic will serve others as well.
    5 points
  7. 4 points
  8. Picked up a T7 recently at a $1500 premium. My other dealer Motoworld wanted a 2k premium. So is life, and supply and demand. Currently have about 400 miles on the clock. I am old but aggressive for my oldness, having a bit of mx racing intermediate class in the olden days. Carlsbad, Saddleback, Perris etc. I beat my bikes up, I bend my rims, I drop them, jump them, and generally hammer them. I also maintain them quite well. Not so much cosmetics but I do keep them mechanically sound. I have a 2011 990 that has gone on about a 50lb diet. Raised to 245mm of highly refined travel, a bit of a bump in horse power and it is a hooligan. It wheelies down the road like a raucous animal and It handles high speed off road with aplomb, I love the bike. It is the blue bike on my website. I have owned the 950 adventure S and the 690 Enduro as well. Have time on the 1090R the Africa twins, a bit of 790R etc as I dial them in for customers. I am going to compare this T7 to the 990 heads up side by side as I do my mods. I ordered a couple items from that Camel guy @Camel ADV and my intent is to make the T7 Better than my 990 adventure. Can I do it against a large WP 50mm shock and 48mm forks with Gobblers? Time will tell and I do not give up easy. So the menu so far: Reduce weight within reason. Increase horsepower within reason as you guys have done. And make the suspension handle everything I can throw at it. Pot holes, getting air, and generally take a flogging, and do it without making the bike ride like a buck board. That is a wagon, horse drawn, for you youngsters out there. So the challenge is getting the suspension on par with 35mm to 45mm less travel. That is the big deal here. The little shock that holds not much oil will only show its size if you go hard on the bike to the point of overheating the shock. Yes go race it and your fluid will be gone at the end of one race. But how many of us are that hard on an adventure bike for any length of time. I can make the action of the shock as good as any with some modifications. How many modifications I do not know but I have some pretty dang happy customers already. I started a thread on another site, but not much interest and should have known better, as the passion for the bike is likely right here. My brother is buying one as well and he will be doing some racing like the Nora and maybe the Virginia City race etc. in the younger old guy 50yr old pro class. That bike will have to be a bit over the top regarding the suspension as we will be competing against Rottweiler and who knows who might pop up for that race. We will see what that entails in a new chapter, but likely will be calling in a favor for some custom parts from the Camel guy as he has some real deal components. If you guys want I am willing to do full build details regarding the suspension allowing you to do some DIY mods. If not no problem I will just post results. Will have to do this post over a bit of time to catch up with where I am, as I have been into this thing several times already. Tomorrow will be yet another prototype Gobbler test for these forks and I am quite optimistic as things are definitely coming along. Thank you for listening, George Suspension101 I love doing suspension and I love motorcycles. Go figure!
    3 points
  9. Figured we were getting a few threads started with different printable parts I would start to compile the parts links here and update the main post with links for quick reference. If the mods want to move this post to a different section that is cool. T7 Frame Plug - remix I did of X_NRG's design Tank Grip Pads - posted up by TheFirePT Wahoo Element Nav Bar Mount - posted up by Rtadlock T7 Hinged Fuel Cap Adapter - posted up by TheFirePT Anti-Bobble Bracket and Ram Mount- ClutchXT
    3 points
  10. To wire directly to the battery as the original power source is thru the bikes electronics and can only handle under 2.5 amps. 2.5 is plenty for dual usb/volt meter, so it goes on the left thru the system. 12v cig socket wired to battery can handle battery charging, tire compressor, etc.
    3 points
  11. Recently rode to Elk City Idaho. Just a couple pictures from the trip. Enjoy. ja
    3 points
  12. Maybe wait a couple days and try out the stock tires. They are not so bad that they have to be replaced immediately. Your plan is to ride on public roads on a ADV bike, slow down and smell the flowers....
    2 points
  13. That's doesn't seem to be a bad price. Offer 8000 and see what they do. It still has warranty on it so that's a good thing and the bike should be in great shape. Buy it if it's the Red One.
    2 points
  14. Ditto to BoonDocker. I just put my Camel spring on last night. Perfect!!! Yamaha could learn a thing or two from that lad.... How dorky of Yamaha to have a double wimpy spring... kickstand springs have only been around for maybe 100 years!
    2 points
  15. I just received email notice my one piece tall comfort will be here by July 31! Will make it in time for my Colorado trip in August. I was actually thinking it may not arrive until Sept. Thank you SC! Looking forward to trying it out!
    2 points
  16. I have a seat joining kit from T7Rally.com that turns the two seat into a one piece rally seat. They sell it for about $40 US and then another $25 to ship from Europe. You can have these for $30 shipped PayPal CONUS. Located in Bellingham Washington you're welcome to pick it up. Will ship out next business day after payment is received. Let me know if you have any questions.
    2 points
  17. Starting in Nevada through Oregon, Washington, Idaho and back to Nv
    2 points
  18. @YukonPete I travel this way, for added safety. I don't care if it rains or freezesLong as I got my plastic Jesus
    2 points
  19. Oh damn...... who found me out?
    2 points
  20. The Tenere 700 is a good bike in strong cross winds, IMHO. It has enough weight to take a good cross wind blast. Maybe not as good as a heavier bike, like a GS 1200, but pretty good. Early this summer, in the Yukon driving on shitty chip seal, I got hit with cross winds so hard that my bike was literally slid 90 degrees sideways while I was going around 60-70 km/h. Very unsettling! Obviously as the gusts get strong ones speed should correspondingly decrease. I now find riding in crazy winds sort of fun! It just takes getting used to. I find that I don't try and fight the wind, but let it blow me around a bit, while still trying to keep my bike on the road!
    2 points
  21. Mr Tarres 13th in class out of 197 riders on the time trial, Event kicks off proper tomorrow but that’s a fantastic start.
    2 points
  22. Not cheap! Almost $1,900 with stainless spokes and their hub, including shipping. I priced out Excel rims built by others with the Outex. Not that much cheaper but no air loss warranty. Bart Factory has a 4 year warranty against their system failing. Ordered early June. Think someone canceled or something because it was supposed to be later this summer. Big expense but as I posted earlier, I kept one new bike for 16 years and another for 15. I intend to ride this thing for a while. That’s my story and I’m sticking to it!
    2 points
  23. Packages arrived today from Italy! This is what they look like: Very slick design and look like they should do the job. Each comes with a warranty card attached. Unfortunately, I have a couple of other projects taking my time, so the tires won't get mounted until later this week but after having a flat because I screwed up a tire change a caused a tube failure, I am ready to go tubeless!
    2 points
  24. FYI Stevoh, I used adv spec racks to mount rackless enduristan (for reason you mentioned about saving side case scratches). Just posted a ride report that shows it. I used a tusk tail rack to merge different systems (very minor adjustment of 4 extra washers on each side). Worked well.
    2 points
  25. Just finished installing some RideADV racks & Turkana HippoHips 30L saddle bags. I will hopefully be getting out to test them in the next few weeks. Had a little trouble installing the RideADV rack on the left side, the bracket that goes to the passenger foot peg was not aligned correctly & I had to file the holes longer to get the screw in. Otherwise they are solid.
    2 points
  26. …And then I was stuck in the sand for 20 minutes.
    2 points
  27. The New Mexico high desert!
    2 points
  28. Yes, that's correct. The motors are built in Japan, then shipped to France where the bikes are assembled. Reassuringly, when I traded in my XSR for the Tenere, the dealer had a quick look over the bike before we settled on a price. When I asked if the workshop wanted to check over the engine, he replied, "No need - we've never had an engine issue with any CP2 bike we've ever sold." Luke: if your dealer is able to identify the cause of your failure during the rebuild, please share it with us.
    2 points
  29. Tonight i finally got my new Dunlop Trailmax Mission tires mounted up on my T7. i can honestly say that i didnt expect that big of difference over my 2000 km old pirelli STR. but all i can say is They transformed the bike. Now its smooth as silk on the tarmac. gone is the headlight vibration that were present in 55 mph or 90 km/h. They are also very quiet in comparsion! But the biggest difference was on gravel. Before with the STR the front wheel wanted to slide away with a sketchy feel in the handlebar. Slippery and almost scary. this times different! i was entering the side and middle strip of loose gravel and it felt like i had knobbies. i was suprised how well these missions hooked up and provided a Very nice feel of control and comfidence. Even on loose surface! rear tire provide a real good bite too being a plus 200 kg bike and weight somtimes shows, This tires is what i feel should had come as standard. NOW what a fun bike to ride! i can Highly Recommend this tires to you that want the best of both worlds.! //Richard
    2 points
  30. Common problem with the stock Pirelli tyre. 99.999% of wobbly front issue is Pirelli tyre defects as there is about 3 threads under different titles on this forum. Wobbly front = change front tyre NOW!!! Edit; forgot to mention one inmate was on his third Pirelli tyre till the wobble disappeared. So if you're front end is wobbling, change it! Preferably to another brand, chances are that another Pirelli is going to faulty. You might falsely conclude it's not the tyre that is the cause.
    2 points
  31. Picked up the missing radiator hose, it's all back together now and been out for a ride. Runs perfectly, no warning lights. Should have done the swap four months ago!
    2 points
  32. TUSK bag fits really well
    2 points
  33. Sorry for your loss. Riding a bike is dangerous! It always has been, and always will be. With over 40 years of riding under my belt, I've had my share of close calls, many bruises and broken bones. I'm lucky I live in a relatively low density area, so riding is inherently less dangerous due to lack of traffic interaction, but I've frequently ridden in high density areas (LA, San Fran, Vancouver, Houston etc) which require more caution, but no less confidence. My only advice is to take some time away from riding. Think about how and where you ride. Being scared, overly cautious and more importantly nervous on the road, makes you more of a danger to yourself and others. Take a riding course from an approved vendor to gain confidence (NOT arrogance). See how you feel then. Be patient. If you still have doubts, give it more time. Take another course from a different vendor, or a higher level of course (I take a new course every few years). The danger and risk will NEVER go away, but your ability to manage that risk can be returned and elevated with time, training and experience. I was discussing with my teenage kids last night about the world population wanting to eliminate risk from our lives as we will live much happier that way. I disagree. I race because I like risks. I ride because I like risks. I ski because I like risk. I also minimize the risk as much as possible through proper safety equipment, training and increasing my abilities by pushing my limits. Life is about living. I'm sure your buddy would want you to keep riding - safely. For a long time. Take your time to re-develop your confidence, and celebrate small wins with gusto. Your life will be more fulfilled on a motorbike, if that's your passion. Good luck!
    2 points
  34. A few pics of my bike on a recent trip to Scotland and Northern Ireland.
    2 points
  35. Sunday's ride in Alberta. Temperature was 22 C and just a touch of wind.
    2 points
  36. @Big RedIf it has narrower rim it probably has 140/80-18 tyre or even narrower. Changed rims scream that some one has been really making an decent off road bike for him self.
    1 point
  37. I ordered the Bumot hard panniers/rack last year. The panniers were very nice, but I couldn't get the rack to fit. I wondered if perhaps the Japanese bike have slightly different luggage hard points than the European-built ones (on which Bumot designed their stuff). Or perhaps the rack was just that far out of spec. The USA distributor sent me a return label but advised that if the rack fit on a test T7 that they would not reimburse the shipping cost (they would subtract it from my refund). I ended up getting a full refund so apparently they repeated the issue. The Bumot rack was quite heavy. I ultimately went with a soft/hard combo of Kriega OS-Base + Givi top box on a B&B Off-road rear rack. I leave the top box at home if going mostly off road. I love this setup.
    1 point
  38. It's just shy of 5lbs difference.
    1 point
  39. I was wondering the same thing. I’m in the market to buy a T7. My only regret would be if they released a model with the SSS forks on it soon.
    1 point
  40. Yamabond7 is what the factory uses on oem grips like the Tracer 900 GTs, FJR1300s and Super Tenere.
    1 point
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