Jump to content
Yamaha Tenere 700 Forum

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/09/2021 in all areas

  1. Our rear cargo rack is finally on the site and ready to go. https://camel-adv.com/collections/yamaha/products/t7-minimalist-rear-cargo-rack We wanted to make a minimalist, low-profile cargo plate that added was just big enough to carry your tool kit or day pack without being too bulky. Also, it acts as a lashing point for rackless soft bags such as the Mosko Moto Reckless line or the Giant Loop type luggage. Our Minimalist rack mounts using the rear two threaded subframe mounts (on the side of the bike) and two down to the back of the subframe. To access the rear mounting points, drilling is required but we include a step drill bit to ensure an easy installation. The Camel ADV T7 Minimalist Rear Cargo Rack kit includes: TIG welded, powder coated, 11ga, 304 stainless steel cargo rack Aluminum thread couplers Aluminum spacers Stainless steel fasteners Step drill bit This cargo rack is not intended to be use with "top box" type luggage or fuel cans over 1 gal (4L)!
    7 points
  2. Hey guys, Nick from Maryland here, 62 years old been on bikes for 50 years of it. I just picked up a new T7 this week and looking forward to some great times.
    6 points
  3. Love my T7. It really is one of the best bikes (54) I've ever owned.
    6 points
  4. Hi I have been lurking on the forum for a couple of months now, buuuut I picked up mine today and rode it home, 420km. All tar unfortunately, but it was still awesome none the less.
    6 points
  5. Thought I'd share some ramblings about my experience acquiring, building, and riding my T7 on the TAT last month. I saved up enough leave to take 5 weeks off work this year, along with two friends, and ride as much of the TAT as we could manage. As you probably know, it's not been easy to find a T7 in dealerships. In the months leading up to our planned departure I was on several wait lists for a T7 and was getting a bit nervous that I would not get one in time to outfit it how I wanted it for the trip. Meanwhile my riding buddies, one on a R1250GSA and one on a WR250R, were putting the final touches on their bikes (smug bastards!). Finally, a month before our planned roll date, I picked up my T7 from a dealership in TX. I began frantically buying parts and accessories for it and putting them on as soon as they were delivered. I also wanted to at least get my first break-in service completed before we left so I wouldn't have to stop early on the trail to change the oil, etc. Long story short, I got everything that I ordered (except for the backordered rally seat) on the bike and changed the oil the day before we left, with exactly 500 miles on the odometer. We loaded up the U-haul, said our goodbyes to family/friends, and headed East. Our original plan was to begin at the outer banks in NC and ride the TAT (a mix of Sam's and Kevin's routes, along with a few detours of our own) to Port Orford, OR. But, mother nature threw us a curve ball, in the form of Hurricane Ida, as we were driving our U-haul (coincidentally emblazoned with a natural disaster on its side!) East to begin riding. We held up in Arkansas for a couple days to see what the storm would do and discuss our best options. As much as we wanted to start on the Atlantic, we figured trying to get through NC and TN dirt after a Hurricane (and additional flooding from a few weeks prior) was a bad idea. So, we opted to start on the Western edge of the storms path in Memphis, TN. We unloaded our bikes and gear in a shady spot at the U-haul drop-off near the TN-MS border. We got geared up and rode down the Mississippi river to join the TAT before it crosses into Arkansas. We started riding in the early afternoon and didn't know what the roads/trails would be like, and didn't know how far we would get or where we would stop on day 1. But, with pretty fast riding conditions we made it to Beebe, AR and stayed in a cheap(ish) hotel since we didn't come across a good spot to camp. Day 2 had some fun riding - a mix of fun, curvy paved roads and dirt - before camping along the Arkansas river in Russellville. Day 3 was similar ... fun, mixed surface, rolling mountain roads, not challenging, and we camped at Devil's Den State Park - where, during the night, raccoons stole my tote bag with my coffee supply, coffee cup, spork, and a couple packs of oatmeal! My fault for leaving it out, but I still will swerve to try to hit any raccoon I see near a road from now on! It should be noted that there are many "dry" counties in AR ... so if you are like me, and enjoy a cold adult beverage while camping, make sure you plan accordingly. We made 'beer runs' to the nearest county lines on nights 2 and 3 ... well worth the effort! Day 4 we crossed the border into OK and rode about 240 miles of farm / county roads before deciding to hotel up in Bartlesville for some showers and laundry. Day 5 brought us our first run-in with OK mud from a recent storm ... and it is no joke!! That mud jammed up under my front fender in no time, which stopped my front wheel from turning ..... which isn't a good thing if you like being able to steer! It was like being on ice as my bike and I started rotating to the right about 90-100 degrees before a low-speed high-side splat into the mud. I almost stuck my unplanned dismount ... taking a few running steps before my boots became caked in the sloppy muck and I face-planted into it as well. Unfortunately no GoPros were on this trip to capture it. We detoured around a few more mud holes and found a car wash to un-cake some mud and ourselves. The WR250R took a few diggers today too, but miraculously the 1250 GS stayed upright - no doubt due to strategically not leading through the muddy sections! We camped at Alabaster Caverns which thankfully had nice free showers to clean ourselves up. Day 6 we put in almost 300 miles and camped at Black Mesa state park, just short of the NM border. A bit more scenery today as we climbed up into the grasslands and had a bit of a rain shower. Black Mesa SP is a nice spot to camp if you find yourselves near it on the TAT. Good campsites and not far off the trail. Pretty canyons and the Cimarron river near the park. Day 7 took us to NM and some pretty, high desert ranch land. We dabbled with one of Kevin's red (difficult) routes and turned around after it turned into a very rocky cow trail. It would've been fun on a dirt bike, but not so much on heavily loaded adv bikes. Plus, we still wanted to cover quite a bit of ground before calling it a day, and this was slow going. Back to the standard route and on to Lathrop State Park in CO. This was a pretty campground, but relatively expensive. They charged a fee for the campsite plus $9 per vehicle (it didn't matter if was an RV or a motorcycle) ... and our attempt at sweet-talking the nice lady at the park entrance didn't help. Now that I think about it, she might've even upped the fee. Day 8 was our first full day of riding in CO and had some fun roads. We had a planned detour to my friend's cabin West of Denver where we met up with family for a couple days of good food, R&R and bike maintenance. After a fun visit at the cabin, on Day 9 (of riding) we retraced our track South to re-join the TAT and head West towards the part of the trail I was most excited for - the high CO passes and Moab canyons. We stopped for groceries and gas in Poncha Springs (near Salida) before climbing up into the San Isabel NF to look for a campsite. Lake O'Haver campground was full, so we continued up towards Marshall Pass and found a nice, primitive campsite just off the road and close to the summit. Day 10 we rode through the Gunnison NF, and some beautiful canyon/rim country. Made it to Lake City, CO for a late lunch, gas, and groceries. Rode up the Engineer Pass road late in the day looking for a campsite before the pass. Lots of Jeeps and side-by-sides on the road since this part of the state is very popular for off-road recreation. We passed many occupied primitive camping sites before finally seeing a turnoff for one with nobody in it. Enjoyed a quiet night in the woods where we were poised to tackle Engineer Pass and some of Colorado's most scenic country the next day. Day 11 a relatively short but challenging day of riding in some of Colorado's most beautiful passes (plus a 14 mile detour into Telluride for gas and groceries). We tackled Engineer Pass in the morning, which included some difficult, rocky terrain, and steep climbs/descents, plus a little rain shower. We rode into Ouray just after 11 am and stopped for an early lunch - which was timely since we beat the lunch rush and sat on a covered balcony during a rain shower. We opted to take Ophir Pass instead of Imogene or Black Bear pass into Telluride. Ophir is the "easy" route according to Kevin, and the standard Sam route. Ophir turned out to be quite challenging in spots due to the large, loose rocks and some big drops. We ran into a young couple in a RAV 4 who had a flat tire on Ophir summit. They didn't know how to change a flat (and had no business being there) so despite sleet coming down, we stopped and changed it for them. My buddy and his 1250GSA finally tipped over while trying to get around a few riders who were struggling to get up a steep section, and the WR250 had a series of falls which put the final nail in the coffin of its doomed aftermarket windshield. Once we finally made it down to Hwy 145 we opted to call it a day and look for a campground. We stayed at Sunshine campground (nice, but no showers), just outside of Telluride, and went into town for gas, groceries, and beer. Day 12 was a fun mix of Forest and BLM roads as we descended from the high mountains of Colorado into the high desert of Utah. Stopped for lunch in Dove Creek, CO and decided to cut off a section of the trail that would have taken us to Monticello (we've all been there!) before looping back and heading North towards the Manti-La Sals. More pavement than we anticipated, but pretty, desolate roads along ranch land and a large mine. We passed through the town of La Sal before climbing up into the forest. We decided to stay on Kevin's standard (blue) track which took us up toward's Geyser Pass ... and past a "road closed ahead" sign, which surely wouldn't apply to us. When we reached the summit around 5:30 pm, we discovered that a fire had burned up there recently and there was significant road work being done. When we turned off our bikes we could hear chainsaws and trees falling up ahead, which didn't bode well for continuing. We decided to camp at a beautiful meadow just shy of the summit.... where we discovered a "fire restrictions in effect" sign sitting in the primitive site's fire ring. Doh! Day 13 was a short but scenic day of descending from 10,500 feet on top of the La Sals to 4,000 feet in Moab, from Aspen groves to canyons and red sand. We ate a good lunch at Zax before checking into a hotel for some laundry and showers. Day 14 we departed Moab and rode some fun canyon roads - some sand and rocks, but not too challenging - on the way to Green River, UT. Stopped at a taco truck for lunch and then continued on Kevin's route (blue) instead of taking the big horseshoe in the desert offered by Sam. We rode into Black Dragon canyon and a fun section of dry canyon wash with some rocky, sandy sections. I was riding sweep during this section and was following a bit too close to the WR250R on a stair-step section. I had to slow down in a less than ideal spot and put my leg out to keep the bike from tipping over, then *** POP!! *** my right hammy was not in good shape. After trying to walk it off for a bit I realized that it wasn't getting any better. I was able to ride out the rest of the trail and get to I-70 and back to Green River. Lots of ice (and a few cold beers) later, I came to the realization that my trip on the TAT was finished for this year. I wouldn't be able to stand up and move the bike around as needed until my hammy recovered. Bummed that I couldn't finish this year, but it was an epic trip (about 3100 miles) nonetheless. The next morning, after some high fives delivered to my two buddies (who continued as far as Western ID), I hit the tarmac and pointed South towards NM and home.
    5 points
  6. Black Widow SC30H. Perfect fit. Easy install. Very happy. Thanks, Cory!
    4 points
  7. I appreciate the people who reported their order/delivery status on this thread as it helped me with the waiting. Received mine Oct 7, ordered June 4, order #101104). I got the Comfort Tall seat (Carbon Fiber Sides / Diamante Vinyl Top). I had Seat Concepts on 3 other bikes, so when the group buy came around, I jumped in. The stock seat is pretty good for me, at least for a couple of hours. A little taller for less knee-bend, a little wider for more tailbone support, and no passenger strap that bugs me when I'm scootching around seemed like worthwhile improvements for the cost and wait. My first sitting impression with the bike on center stand was that it was too tall. Felt like I was leaning forward more, putting more pressure on my hands. Not being a sportbiker, I'm used to a very upright riding position. With a 34" inseam, I can still flat-foot it. Sitting static is only a small part of the seating story. Turns out the wind pressure on my shoulders at highway speed pushes me back enough to negate the increased hand pressure when still. I often wear knee braces when I ride, so having a little less knee bend was a welcome relief in that department. Bottom line - barely thought about the seat on my test ride, which is kind of an accolade as seats go. My next 4.5-hour transit will be a more telling test. the comparison shot
    4 points
  8. ANTIGRAVITY ATZ-10 BATTERY INSTALL: Finally got around to installing the lithium-ion battery. I've used these on my past 5 moto's and they have been flawless. Stock T7 battery: 6.90lbs (3.12 kgs) Antigravity ATZ-10: 2.14lbs (0.97kgs) Total weight savings of 4.76lbs (2.15kgs)!! I'm working on a poorly edited 1 year review video with total weight and upgrades. Thanks for looking
    4 points
  9. Two items were backordered for a long time and arrived within a week of each other, and the heated grips could wait till after summer. Koso Apollo Heated Grips - I've used Oxfords on the S-10 and generic elements on other bikes. The Oxfords work very well but the controller is a bit chunky and requires some clever mounting. Also, on both sets I've had, the left grip has melted. That is to say - very worn looking and tacky feeling. I think this is a result of parking outside during Las Vegas summers rather than the element overheating. I like the integrated controller/setting indicator on the Koso better than any other option and at around $120, competitively priced. I made the wiring tidy and plugged into the OEM heated grips plug. First test ride today and they are meeting expectations. AltRider Windscreen adjuster. It took 3.5 months from order to delivery. Looks like a quality unit and works as advertised, but is a couple of points away from perfect. For one thing, I couldn't find installation instructions on the AltRider website. Granted it wasn't hard to figure out but I'm a read-the-instructions-first kind of guy. Then there's the adjustment mechanism - 4 thumbscrews accessed from the front of the windscreen. Maybe I like to fiddle with settings too much or it's unsafe to adjust your windscreen while riding, but having to stop and get off the bike for an adjustment doesn't curry favor with me. Then there are those thumbscrews with square-head bolts and plastic washers. They work well and are easy enough to use but I'm a little paranoid about losing one. It's not like you can locktite it because they're meant to be adjusted. I scrounged up a couple of spare nut/bolt/washer sets for my tool kit, just in case. I tested 4 positions on a mostly highway (65-70 mph) ride. Found the highest setting to be smoothest, and the screen is well below my sightline (6' tall). In the long run, I'll probably stick with low for slow and high for fast. The differences are not dramatic, but wind noise and turbulence have a cumulative effect on longer rides. screen in lowest position screen in highest position The wind tunnel guys are probably having a coniption about that big gap. Don't know yet if it bothers me. Seat Concepts Comfort Tall seat (Carbon Fiber Sides / Diamante Vinyl Top) - This is the big item, literally and figuratively. I had Seat Concepts on 3 other bikes, so when the group buy came around, I jumped in. The stock seat is pretty good for me, at least for a couple of hours. A little taller for less knee-bend, a little wider for more tailbone support, and no passenger strap that bugs me when I'm scootching around seemed like worthwhile improvements for the cost and wait (4.2 months; order #101104). My first sitting impression with the bike on center stand was that it was too tall. Felt like I was leaning forward more, putting more pressure on my hands. Not being a sportbiker, I'm used to a very upright riding position. With a 34" inseam, I can still flat-foot it. Sitting static is only a small part of the seating story. Turns out the wind pressure on my shoulders at highway speed pushes me back enough to negate the increased hand pressure when still. I often wear knee braces when I ride, so having a little less knee bend was a welcome relief in that department. Bottom line - barely thought about the seat on my test ride, which is kind of an accolade as seats go. My next 4.5-hour transit will be a more telling test. seat installed That's an Outback Motortek luggage rack - no interference. SC compared to stock It's a snug fit, at least the first time, but I hear that's expected. (the hanging strap is for my tank bag)
    4 points
  10. I have a set of the OBR Adv Grip Mitts. They help. One set for 3 bikes, it's a very cost-effective option.
    4 points
  11. So, I installed the @Camel ADV brackets and have to thanks them for their cracking install videos on all products! Bottom attachment is fiddly, as shown, but the solution is first class and took me a careful 30 minutes. I'd do it again in half that. For a handmade product, they are a superb fit.
    3 points
  12. Just done some measuring and there's 7 inches of clearance to the fender. Max travel on stock forks is 8.3 inches so if it bottomed out it would definitely hit the light. To be safe I'll move the bracket so the light sits higher in line with the crash bar. Good tip mate and thanks for pointing that out. Just takes one good road pothole somewhere in Italy..
    3 points
  13. Similar to A Series of Unfortunate Events, my build was rather hap hazard instead of a well executed planned operation. I bought an unused Camel Adventure Tail tidy kit and ordered Cyclops signals. I then added Adventure Spec side and rear racks. It all went together well. Then I added a Huzar exhaust with 50cm muffler. The pipe and muffler fit well. But the turn signals were doomed. I wanted to buy a universal signal relocate bracket, but it was mostly out of stock. To compound the situation, I needed to maintain the side reflectors, I have to retain a safety sticker plate below the license plate, and I am unwilling to give up my dual helmet locks attached to the license plate. I started out with 1” aluminum angle stock, but it wasn’t wide enough to push the side reflectors out past the license plate. The second set I made with 1.5” aluminum angle stock. I cut/ground/sanded it to a desired shape. Which took forever as I’m not a skilled machinist, just a farm boy with big ideas. But at least it turned out looking better that two pieces of angle stock bolted on. Hopefully this will help someone with the after market exhausts conflict with the turn signals. or….. Welcome to my Untidy Tail Tidy Build
    3 points
  14. I purchased the Camel Tail Tidy after several rides as the stock set up was kinda like a flag in the wind back there. Ugly too. The Camel product is available with the tear drop washers that allow reuse of the original lights. You can get the washers to suit LEDs as well. This unit is solid and built to last. Easy to install, just follow the Camel ADV video that shows you how to remove the old stuff, install the new and put it back together. Before... After...
    3 points
  15. Relay loom I made yesterday (with diode):
    3 points
  16. OK, pics as promised. Thanks to some write-ups and YouTube vids this powered up first time!! Result!
    3 points
  17. Long story short, I bought the standard eBay brake pedal extension to help find the rear pedal with the standard pegs installed. It was garbage so sent it back and carried on with the standard set up but adjusted the pedal up a tad, which was better but far from perfect. Felt the pegs weren't wide enough, especially when standing so ordered the Bosley Rally pegs with -20mm. They worked well but now the bracket felt even wider and I was having to move my right foot in to the left to get contact with the brake pedal; not ideal in an emergency so something needed to be done. The only sensible solution that looked like it would work was the AltRider base pedal on it's own without the riser but at £58 GBP a shot I thought I was taking the mick out of myself, quite frankly. If I'd had some 4-5mm aluminium or steel plate hanging around I'd have made one for next to nothing but I didn't and couldn't be bothered spending hours ordering in what I needed so I bit the bullet and ordered the AltRider product. Short and sweet is it works and looks like it extends the pedal pretty much exactly where I want it. I'll have nightmares paying nearly 60 quid for a 2 square inch piece of metal but it's done the job and my time is also money, I guess.. The flip side is it's good quality and fits in a couple of minutes, so the wife was happy.. Here are some pics that might give you some perspective on the pedal extension with the Bosley Rally Pegs.
    3 points
  18. Bought it Installed: LED Indicators Rally Tail Tidy Rally Bash Guard OEM Radiator Guard OEM Engine Bars Akrapovic Tank & Side Pads Quadlock Screen Protector Kriega Luggage Loops Removed Pillion Foot Pegs Removed Pillion Seat Strap Front Seat Hack (no need to use allen key) Replaced above with Kriega lashing brackets Still To Do (immediately): Camel Anti-Bobble Head Acerbis Handguards Smaller Unbreakable Rear Plate Soft Luggage Solution Tracker Install It's been a fun day...
    3 points
  19. @Tenman Welcome and good first post, complete with eye candy! Bummer on the dealer treatment, but you've provided enough info for others to help if possible. You might consider posting your experience here, could save someone a similar bit of grief. Good luck with your search.
    3 points
  20. Today, zero degrees Celsius before the sunrise, but I like that kind of weather.
    3 points
  21. I hadn't noticed this thread before. I have to give props to my dealer. Bobby J's Yamaha in Albuquerque is the oldest Yamaha dealer in the country. Family owned since 1956. When I decided to pull the trigger I went in and talked to Keith (an owner). I had just missed an opportunity to put a deposit down on an incoming bike. He told me the date of the next order cycle and the approximate arrival date. There was no greedy mark up; $11,500 OTD. He stayed in communication and the bike arrived in the time frame he estimated.
    3 points
  22. Season's going towards the end, but there's still some nice days of riding left
    3 points
  23. It's getting wet and cold now, so not long until I'll park the bike for the winter. Some photos from yesterdays ride. Some nice gravel roads and some very nice twisty roads. If this was the last ride of the season, it was a good one . The whole route: Season end? - Real time GPS tracker - LocaToWeb Follow RbR on a map via GPS
    3 points
  24. Just transferred the connector from my old bike to the T700. I've had these gloves for 4 years now and they're one of the best investments I've made. Most here seem to use heated grips but I've always found that the palm of my hand was not where I needed the heat but rather the back of my hand which was being hit by cold wind during the ride, so I stopped using heated grips and changed instead to heated gloves which I've found spot on. If you can find a pair of the Gerbing 12V XRS-12 Short Gloves they're excellent quality and very comfy with adjustable heat settings.
    3 points
  25. Since two or three weeks, Yamaha Deutschland (Germany) pinned the price tag to their R7 offerings. It is 9449 EUR for the black or blue one, and 9849 EUR for the 60th anniversary. The price is inclusive tax and preparation fee, or what is the term, out of the door price? Anyhow, that is quite okay, maybe some successful negotiation or some goodies on top. For me I have a R7 60th on order now, to be delivered in spring 2022. Think it is still the better package compared to a RS660 which is about 11050 EUR out of the door. Maybe some better Aprilia deals will follow, the selling is not so good or far away from expectations. Especially when I hear that a dealer close to me has 30 RS + 30 Tuono still on stock, will get a little close to get them all rid this year. Better package means, I know what I buy, if it is a Yamaha. New 660 Aprilia did already some serious recalls incl. complete engine change. This is not so trust building. There is some more nominal power, but on the negative side loads of (for me) not needed electronic aids. I feel good with my decision. BR hombacher
    3 points
  26. My feeling is I may need a new headlight. I'll let the dealer take a look as it's impossible to say until then. He thought it could be a blown resistor.
    2 points
  27. I doubt that a specialized mechanic needs five hours for the job. Here are instructions that I made a while ago. Funny that the topic is not pinned.
    2 points
  28. Another vote for the Cardo. Mesh works well, and the unit connects straight away with a buddy who I hadn't ridden with for over a month, already while riding towards our meet-up location. The app actually isn't the greatest - had a lot of hassle when trying to connect a group, but if you can learn some of the basic key combinations, things work out well. The voice recognition and "ok google" support works well for mimic Music etc. As for Chinese: the Cardo will also use components sourced in China, so if you dig deep enough, you'll end up with China anyway.
    2 points
  29. Cory makes good stuff! That being said, I ran my T7 with the stock indicators and the Camel pipe (not recommended, which is why I had to do it...) and....well somewhere along the forestry trunk road is my blinker lens and the blinker body looks like its seen the bright end of a propane torch. For all you inhabitants of Canuckistan, I'm now running these...Available at Canadian Tire, with my Camel Tail Tidy. Just need to see Cory for a new flasher relay. And if you break one (or more) off, they are $30 for a set of four, and are bright! Alpena LED Moto Signal | Canadian Tire Alpena LED Moto Signal adds a sequential sweep design to your motorcycle Installs on almost all motorcycles using a 10 mm handlebar
    2 points
  30. That's a bang up job you did there @DuncMan. Looks like a diamond ring on your new lady. Bright too. Good job.
    2 points
  31. Hold up, front seat hack? No need to use allen key? What's this now? I really want a one piece seat in the long run, but it'll be months before I can get a SC seat (that lead time, tho!) and I really, REALLY hate needing a tool to remove the seat. Edit: Did my own homework like a good forumgoer:
    2 points
  32. In keeping with my new less-is-more approach to riding, I recently bought Green Chile Adventure Gear's Pecos Value Bundle for use on both my T7 and R1200GS when traveling. Pecos Value Bundle This is one of the most flexible luggage systems you will ever use. They are built to withstand the gnarliest adventures, and allow you to keep the weight down for better off... To date, test fitting only on the T7 and one 380 mile day on the GS with the 20 liter bags loaded with camping gear. I'm very impressed with the simplicity, innovation and functionality of this system, not to mention it truly is a great value.
    2 points
  33. If you are getting a lot of backfiring, check for exhaust leaks at the connections. A leak in the connections can let air into the pipe during deaccelration and create a backfire or pop.
    2 points
  34. The problem with their approach is you have to use the Leo Vince header and cut part of the frame like the Camel ADV approach. I just bought a $10k bike. I'm not hacking parts of the frame off just so I can fit a different exhaust. Now lets get to the price. $389 for LV Header, $200 for M.U.D. midpipe ( still need a can), or $400 for a can and midpipe. Their website is difficult to sort out exact cost since it's all still showing Sold Out and the drop down menus are a little vague. Either way you're into this for $500 or $700. Or you can get the Huzar for $250 shipped to your door, you don't void your warranty because your frame is intact and the products are actually in stock. ( Ok ordering is still a bit of an "Exercise in diplomacy") but pricing is straight forward. J
    2 points
  35. For that price, I can cut a piece of aluminum and make a new bracket or otherwise modify it as needed.
    2 points
  36. Cardo Packtalk Bold. Had integrated Sena in a Schuberth or BMW helmet for years and really didn’t fancy a ‘bolt on’, but it’s the best thing I’ve bought. Use whatever you want (or don’t want) - - nav, music, FM radio, phone etc and if your riding mates get the same, the mesh intercom is outstanding. We ride as a group (2-5 people) regularly on trips over a few days and chatting as you ride was a revelation to me and makes those trips even more enjoyable.
    2 points
  37. Gepäckträger + Halter für Yamaha Tenere 700 19-21 Bagtecs SLP Gepäckbrücke <h2>Das perfekte Spar-Set, passend für deine Yamaha Tenere 700 19-21</h2><p>Du brauchst einen unserer Artikel für dein Motorrad? Wir...
    2 points
  38. I live in CT and there hasn’t been a year in he last 10 when I have not gotten out on a bike at least once during each month on the calendar. You don’t know what you are missing. Heated jacket, grips and decent gear make it completely fine for several hour rides. As long as the roads are dry and clear it’s fine. The best part is that all the great roads that are normally clogged with Sunday drivers and tourists are clear of traffic, and you have really great sight lines through corners without all the vegitation.
    2 points
  39. That early rally seat is my best addition by far. It doubles the comfort/distance, for me anyway.
    2 points
  40. After a 2 day trip in colder weather, I just ordered a set of those OBR grip mitts. My hands/fingers were the only part of me that suffered with temps in the single digits.
    2 points
  41. @GoldentacoI installed my OC last night and did just as you described to remove the oem lower comp adjuster. With the top cap cracked loose prior to removing from the bike, once removed I used my impact driver to spin the comp stack out completely and drained through the lower leg. My technique for the impact driver was to hold the fork, top cap down, on a piece of foam, I would simultaneously compress the fork with my left hand/body weight while hitting it with a burst from the impact driver. So abruptly push down on the fork to compress it as far as I could and pull the impact trigger at the same time. This had the comp stack out in about 30 seconds. Then while upright in my bench vise with a drain pan underneath, I removed the top cap and pulled the oem cartridge out. Worked perfect and no need for the tool. Overall the Install was no more difficult than changing fork seals on any open chamber fork (I reused my oem seals and won't change them until they start leaking).
    2 points
  42. The only thing I don't like with heated gloves is wearing a wiring harness. They tend to get tangled and can be unwieldy and uncomfortable. During the cold weather I always use the same jacket so I sew small velcro tabs on the outside of the inner liner so the wiring stays exactly where I want it, is completely hidden from view and I can't even feel it's there. The glove sockets are always exactly where I need them, as is the heat controller and socket that connects to the bike. Makes the whole experience painless and warm!
    2 points
  43. Sure, I've had a few rides in with them both on my T7 and on my Tracer 900GT. Takes less than a minute to move from one bike to another. They don't move at all, even at way above highway speeds (180kph on the way home from work yesterday). They fit perfectly on either bike and will on basically any bike with handguards. It's a very simple method to strap them on, but between their weirdly rigid construction and the method of attachment, they don't move around at all. What's always kept me away from Hippo Hands and their ilk is the fear that they'll get in the way of reaching the controls quickly if I've taken my hands off the bars, but that's not a problem with these. They remain open and reach juuuuuuust past the grip (like maybe 3/4" rearwards of the handlebar grips) which is just enough to shelter your hands completely but also to remain open and keep those grips readily accessible. On the Tracer, at 0C I have the grips on their lowest setting and my thin, light summer gloves. On the Tenere, my oxford heaters at one or two pips up, and again the thin summer gloves. Any higher grip settings and my hands get too hot. They look silly (particularly on the Tracer) but they definitely work extremely well. Looking silly is literally the only negative they've got IMHO.
    2 points
  44. London Ridge. West Kootenay, BC
    2 points
  45. Today, I woke up before the sunrise, went for a spin and had a nap by the river.
    2 points
  46. After a prolonged job ( which took up many weekends ) I finally got out for a decent ride and test the KTech suspension. Most impressed over sharp rock edges, stray roots and angled washouts. Love it. In the right hands a good match for the 701
    2 points
This leaderboard is set to Denver/GMT-06:00

Our Friends

Tenere across the USA

Tenere 700 Forum. We are just Tenere 700 owners and fans

Tenere700.net is not affiliated with Yamaha Motor Co and any opinions expressed on this website are solely those of ea individual author and do not represent Yamaha Motor Co or Tenere700.net .

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.