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Tazmool

Useful Tools to Tinker with your T7, Suspension Edition

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Tazmool

Hello Everyone, 

 

Here is a short list of tools that may be handy to tinker with your T7's suspension 

Something you can check (when you get your bike) is the static sag.  Setting it correctly can have a great improvement on handling and overall ride quality.


Checking the static sag on the front and rear of the bike can be challenging if you're doing it by yourself, but this tool will help:
slacker1.thumb.jpg.eb779ad0c347cf12a0add877b3203ee0.jpg
This is basically a digital tape measure, made to attach to bikes, with a remote display you can attach to your handlebars.  Easy to use, handy to measure your suspension sag.


Lets say you find out that you cant get the static sag numbers you're looking for (bike is under sprung or oversprung) which would mean you may need to change out your springs. 
Not a tough job, but you will need some more tools. 


Lets start with the rear spring (I hear the T7 can use a rear re-spring, unless you're quite light)

Rear shock is fairly easy to get out using standard tools, but to remove the spring, you'll need one of these:
rear-spring-compressor1.thumb.jpg.40d2d9534e322e9f2cea5ea2b7243f51.jpg

This is a simple spring compressor, you attach it, compress the spring, get the end cap off the rear shock, remove shock, uncompress spring.  
Compress new spring, insert shock, install end cap, uncompress spring.  Install shock in bike, and voila!  

Go back to the 1st tool and check your sag again.    Yay its good!

 

Front spring swap is a tad more work.  
Getting the forks off is not too bad, normal tools needed.  
To lift the front off the ground, an A-Ladder is a good way.

 

Once you have the forks off, you'll need something like this:

fork-spring-compressors1.thumb.jpg.2b36f1eda454244425e6d0d50f399072.jpg

These are two different tools, but they both do the same thing. 
The upper yellow color one is a big fork spring compressor, its the tool of choice.  It works like the rear spring compressor, making the job fairly easy. 
The black hoop with the handles is a manual spring compressor, ie you push down on the spring to get the spring below the damper nut (installing the U shaped tool to hold the spring down) get the cap off, uncompress, replace spring, replace fork oil (check level) 

And Voila! 

Use tool #1 to check your sag, and enjoy better handling and ride quality!

The tools are not expensive, and they will last a lifetime (well the mechanical tools anyway) 
 

Enjoy!

 

Tazmool

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moto3

Great write-up.

 

Thanks for the Info 👍

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bth2

great ,thanks.

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FAR&FURTHER

This is cool selection of tools. As I'm stuck in Morocco, when I asked if I can change the rear spring somewhere, people were like... sure easy any mechanic. To which I replied, and what about the spring compressor?

 

We just use ratchet straps, was the answer.

 

.... so I still have my old spring 😂

 

Proper tools are a must, hate the bodged jobs. I'm feeling uneasy to work on T7 on the road without my torque wrench 🤷🏻‍♂️

 

Thanks for sharing

Pavel

---
https://farandfurther.org

https://youtube.com/farandfurther

https://instagram.com/farandfurther

 

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RTW Ténéré 700, UK to India & back on Honda CB500X

farandfurther.org | YouTube | Instagram

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ADVUSA
Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, FAR&FURTHER said:

This is cool selection of tools. As I'm stuck in Morocco, when I asked if I can change the rear spring somewhere, people were like... sure easy any mechanic. To which I replied, and what about the spring compressor?

 

We just use ratchet straps, was the answer.

 

.... so I still have my old spring 😂

 

Proper tools are a must, hate the bodged jobs. I'm feeling uneasy to work on T7 on the road without my torque wrench 🤷🏻‍♂️

 

Thanks for sharing

Pavel

---
https://farandfurther.org

https://youtube.com/farandfurther

https://instagram.com/farandfurther

 

I've never heard of changing with ratchet straps, looks possible and sketchy.

There is a KoolAid logo in the video, perhaps that's needed?

 

Edited by ADVUSA
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Tazmool

Even if doing the job just a few times, or even once, I prefer having the proper tools to do it with. 
Especially since good tools last a lifetime.  Both the rear spring, and fork spring compressors make the job quite easy to do.

However, if you have to get it done right now, and dont have time to order in thet tool, using the ratchet strap is an option, and a fairly clever one at that.  

 

Tazmool

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Ktmmitch
Posted (edited)

The Fork Leg Tool ,shown above, is for Closed Cartridge like WP Cone Valve, where you need to compress the fork leg in order to push out the lower cap from the leg, then use the slotted plate to prevent it returning back in whilst you undo the lower cap.

This is not needed with the T7, it has a conventional Open Cartridge, and can be disassembled without this tool, it is designed for a different type of fork.

The only workshop tool needed is this cartridge tool to hold the T7 cartridge whilst removing the compression adjuster in the bottom of the fork leg.

 

 

Edited by Ktmmitch
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Stabilo_Boss
3 hours ago, Ktmmitch said:

The Fork Leg Tool ,shown above, is for Closed Cartridge like WP Cone Valve, where you need to compress the fork leg in order to push out the lower cap from the leg, then use the slotted plate to prevent it returning back in whilst you undo the lower cap.

This is not needed with the T7, it has a conventional Open Cartridge, and can be disassembled without this tool, it is designed for a different type of fork.

The only workshop tool needed is this cartridge tool to hold the T7 cartridge whilst removing the compression adjuster in the bottom of the fork leg.

 

 

So to replace the spring in the fork, the Cartridge tool is the only specialised equipment needed?

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Ktmmitch
1 minute ago, Stabilo_Boss said:

So to replace the spring in the fork, the Cartridge tool is the only specialised equipment needed?

Correct, in fact you only need the Cartridge Tool if you want to remove the cartridge, to remove the spring it's just a case of normal spanners etc

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Stabilo_Boss
Just now, Ktmmitch said:

Correct, in fact you only need the Cartridge Tool if you want to remove the cartridge, to remove the spring it's just a case of normal spanners etc

That is good news.

So if the intention is to re-valve the cartridge, at that point the tool would be necessary?

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Ktmmitch
5 minutes ago, Stabilo_Boss said:

That is good news.

So if the intention is to re-valve the cartridge, at that point the tool would be necessary?

You need to remove the cartridge to revalve the piston, so would need the tool.

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Tazmool

This post was only related to checking your static sag and spring replacement, and  tools that make the job a lot easier.
I did not delve into replacing the cartridges.

 

I just double checked the service manual for the T7, very clearly it states that you do need a spring compression tool to remove the spring/cap assembly.
The manual references a very simple hand tool, which I've used quite a few times, the big spring compressor makes the job a lot easier if you're doing the job solo, plus its useful for other more complicated forks as well. 
 

Tazmool

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