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How off-road is this bike?


Moto
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Just got a T7 here in the USA. My first impression is that this is a big bike. Bigger than I'm used to, anyway. I'm writing to ask for your experiences in riding this bike on harder single track. Maybe rocky, roots, hilly, tight, enduro-like riding. Can this bike do that? Or is it kind of crazy to think of doing that? I know that if that's what I most wanted to do, I bought the wrong bike. But say I'm connecting 4x4 roads with a single track section that has a Difficult to Very Difficult rating? Interested to know if any of you do that kind of riding, and how the T7 handles it.

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The bike is better than most of us. This is a stock suspension T700.

 

 

Edited by REDHORSECA
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Check out the DATS Dirt Chimps channel on YT for some good big bike enduro footage.  Funny guys riding some pretty technical trails in BC Canada.

 

I think it shows the actual capability of the bike with an experienced and talented but non-pro rider pretty well.  

 

 

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16 hours ago, Moto said:

Just got a T7 here in the USA. My first impression is that this is a big bike. Bigger than I'm used to, anyway. I'm writing to ask for your experiences in riding this bike on harder single track. Maybe rocky, roots, hilly, tight, enduro-like riding. Can this bike do that? Or is it kind of crazy to think of doing that? I know that if that's what I most wanted to do, I bought the wrong bike. But say I'm connecting 4x4 roads with a single track section that has a Difficult to Very Difficult rating? Interested to know if any of you do that kind of riding, and how the T7 handles it.

I ride desert single track all the time. A typical ride for me is freeway out to the Mojave preserve, 2 track to some wash, desert wash for a bit, and single track to connect the areas. It'll do hard singletrack just fine but it's way more work than on my DRZ. I find I actually need to just slow down and let this tractor motor do it's job.

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WOW. Just watched the Pol Tarres video. Holy buckets. Thanks for the link, RedhorseCA.

 

Question answered - in spades.

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@flyloki - Enjoyed the Dirt Chimps vid too. Those guys know how to have fun! I'm inspired.

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8 hours ago, nelsonccc said:

I ride desert single track all the time. A typical ride for me is freeway out to the Mojave preserve, 2 track to some wash, desert wash for a bit, and single track to connect the areas. It'll do hard singletrack just fine but it's way more work than on my DRZ. I find I actually need to just slow down and let this tractor motor do it's job.

This sounds like exactly the kind of riding I hope to do. Thanks! Now I know the only limitation is me...

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On 10/21/2020 at 1:18 PM, Moto said:

WOW. Just watched the Pol Tarres video. Holy buckets. Thanks for the link, RedhorseCA.

 

Question answered - in spades.

Well let's be realistic here. The guy in that video is clearly a Grade A trials rider. He could perform those stunts on practically any motorcycle. But that does not mean the bike is 'built' for it.

As an eagle-eyed Youtuber commented, you can see a clear spoke blow out at around 2:40.

So while I don't want to discourage you from learning to become a better rider and taking your T7 places many would not take a regular dirt bike, just keep in mind that at the end of that video the guy was very likely left with a T7 with busted rims, bent suspension and possible chassis damage from all those hard landings.

 

 

 

Edited by Hogan
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2 hours ago, Hogan said:

Well let's be realistic here. The guy in that video is clearly a Grade A trials rider. He could perform those stunts on practically any motorcycle. But that does not mean the bike is 'built' for it.

As an eagle-eyed Youtuber commented, you can see a clear spoke blow out at around 2:40.

So while I don't want to discourage you from learning to become a better rider and taking your T7 places many would not take a regular dirt bike, just keep in mind that at the end of that video the guy was very likely left with a T7 with busted rims, bent suspension and possible chassis damage from all those hard landings.

 

 

 

Do you really think that is a spoke blowout?? I'm talking about the bit at 2:45.

I think the back wheel has picked up and thrown 5 sticks or similar in the air. Spokes don't generally go flying through the air when the break, they usually stay attached at the end that isn't broken. 

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4 hours ago, Hogan said:

Well let's be realistic here. The guy in that video is clearly a Grade A trials rider. He could perform those stunts on practically any motorcycle. But that does not mean the bike is 'built' for it.

As an eagle-eyed Youtuber commented, you can see a clear spoke blow out at around 2:40.

So while I don't want to discourage you from learning to become a better rider and taking your T7 places many would not take a regular dirt bike, just keep in mind that at the end of that video the guy was very likely left with a T7 with busted rims, bent suspension and possible chassis damage from all those hard landings.

 

 

 

I agree it's not the bike for thrashing around to that level, but by the sounds of it the bike made out just fine with only some extra fork oil. 

 

"...while the Tenere’s suspension was prepared by Erik Augé, with more oil in the fork for a stiffer, more stunt-proof ride. During some of the harshest landings you still hear both the front and especially the rear suspension clunk hard on the stops, yet Javi told us that after their week-long shoot the Yamaha “was totally in perfect condition after seven days of crazy riding to the limit.” " -advpulse

Location: Central Ontario, Canada

Riding footage: www.instagram.com/beefmoto

Message me if you are close - let's go riding!

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What impresses me most is not the superman stunts, but the way he finesses the bike around with balance and power - like how he turns the bike (and of course the wheelies). What I learned is that I don't have to be intimidated by the size and weight. I'm inspired to try harder riding 'cause I know it's possible.

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7 hours ago, Whitey66 said:

Do you really think that is a spoke blowout?? I'm talking about the bit at 2:45.

I think the back wheel has picked up and thrown 5 sticks or similar in the air. Spokes don't generally go flying through the air when the break, they usually stay attached at the end that isn't broken. 

Very straight and shiny sticks that look remarkably similar to the spokes on the bike? Spokes will fatigue at both ends in an impact and can easily break in two locations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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6 hours ago, Hogan said:

Very straight and shiny sticks that look remarkably similar to the spokes on the bike? Spokes will fatigue at both ends in an impact and can easily break in two locations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So you're saying that 5 spokes all break at exactly the same time and come out in exactly the same place from the rim??

I've seen and repaired hundreds of broken motorcycle spokes and i've never seen even one break in the way you mention, they either break at the nipple or at the hub.  I'm not saying that it can't happen, but please, not 5 at the same time in the same place without the rim going out of shape. Do you think it's just coincidence that they happen to ALL come out with he roost from the back tyre. Why wouldn't they go in all directions due to the centrifugal force??

 

Do yourself a favour and download this movie in 4K, then save it to a file and play it with VLC Media Player. Go to > Playback  > Speed > Slower (fine) then go to the section where he rides over the boat. Use the "E" key on your keyboard to go frame by frame. You can clearly see that all of the spokes are intact after he rides over the boat and as he comes around the bend before he puts the power on and the stuff that gets thrown up is from below the tyre (You can actually see all of the spokes are intact as he corners). If you look closely at the flying pieces they are much shorter than a spoke and not as shiny as the spokes on the wheel in the same frame shot. 

Tip of the day - Don't believe everything you see and read on Youtube 👍

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3 hours ago, Whitey66 said:

So you're saying that 5 spokes all break at exactly the same time and come out in exactly the same place from the rim??

I've seen and repaired hundreds of broken motorcycle spokes and i've never seen even one break in the way you mention, they either break at the nipple or at the hub.  I'm not saying that it can't happen, but please, not 5 at the same time in the same place without the rim going out of shape. Do you think it's just coincidence that they happen to ALL come out with he roost from the back tyre. Why wouldn't they go in all directions due to the centrifugal force??

 

Do yourself a favour and download this movie in 4K, then save it to a file and play it with VLC Media Player. Go to > Playback  > Speed > Slower (fine) then go to the section where he rides over the boat. Use the "E" key on your keyboard to go frame by frame. You can clearly see that all of the spokes are intact after he rides over the boat and as he comes around the bend before he puts the power on and the stuff that gets thrown up is from below the tyre (You can actually see all of the spokes are intact as he corners). If you look closely at the flying pieces they are much shorter than a spoke and not as shiny as the spokes on the wheel in the same frame shot. 

Tip of the day - Don't believe everything you see and read on Youtube 👍

Lol, Ok... I'll take your word for it.

I don't really care enough to bother doing all that.

 

 

 

 

 

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Some Single track T700 videos.

 

 

 

 

Just hauling ass on some fire roads

 

 

 

 

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So took the T7 on single-track outing today. I stayed with blue/intermediate trails, and it was a success! Trails weren't technical, but had plenty of whoops with some rooty and rocky sections, as well as tight turns/switchbacks and berms. My MotoZ Tractionator RallZ front tire was awesome. Stuck and very stable - good on the hard road getting there, too. Overall impressions: Suspension worked really nicely. Did bottom the forks once on a bigger hit, but on whoops at speed suspension soaked up the bumps. I'm running the clickers several clicks more aggressive than stock both front and rear. The bike is big and heavy for sure, but it was capable enough to be fun! Balance is everything. The motor will tractor nicely over obstacles, but I had to be much more mindful of balance than with smaller bikes. The rear brake is still weird. Hard to get a feel for it. Maybe it needs to break in more. Front is powerful and good. Also just mounted a Hepco and Becker center stand, and it stayed put - no problem. Last impression: hate the rear tire now. Gotta get a real knobby on next. It's too unpredictable when trying to slide with power. There are no side traction knobs on the thing! Ok in a straight line, but try to kick the rear out with power and it skates alarmingly. Had a great day! Can't wait for more. 

IMG_7983.jpg

Edited by Moto
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How fast did you have the bike going on the road?

I have a front tractionator tire and have not put it on because of a lot of reports of almost dangerous wander and wobble over tar snakes at speed.

I think I will just throw it on and try it, can always switch it out if no good.

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Spent two days in Wales at the Yamaha Off Road Experience back in September 2020 when you were still allowed to go there (pre second COVID lockdown)! 12 of us in the group plus 2 instructors and all bikes were fitted with enduro tyres ("tires" if you are in the USA) and protection bars other than that they were standard. Once we had got used to the extra size compared with say a WR250/450 it was amazing what we managed to ride. Forest gravel trails, steep single track and forestry. The main issue is that at low speeds the top heavy weight with a full tank of petrol ("gas" in the USA) is obvious. It was dry (unusual for Wales) and I'm sure it would have been a different story if we'd had to cope with deep mud and slime. Tyres are the critical variable here. On the basis of this I purchased my own Tenere but I'm keeping my WR450. 

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Yes, it's top heaviness is a bit scary when you're slow and struggling with balance. Better dirt tires help so much!

Edited by Moto
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1 hour ago, DWEL700 said:

How fast did you have the bike going on the road?

I have a front tractionator tire and have not put it on because of a lot of reports of almost dangerous wander and wobble over tar snakes at speed.

I think I will just throw it on and try it, can always switch it out if no good.

I read about the wander too, and so was thinking about it. Didn't feel a hint of any problems. I was up to 75 MPH and rode about 120 miles of twisty back country two-lane paved roads plus some short interstate to get to the riding area. I was very happy with it leaning over in turns and tracking where the bike was going. Have no idea what people are feeling with 'wander and wobble'. I did do a static balance after mounting, using the axle and some blocks of wood. It wasn't super precise because the new bearings are stiff and don't allow the wheel to spin easily. Despite that, I could tell I needed to add some lead weights opposite the valve stem. No vibration/balance issues either, so maybe I just did a good guess on the weights. I'd recommend checking your balance after mounting as maybe if the wheel has a balance problem people feel it as a wander/wobble. A buddy rode my bike on the paved road section too, and said it was "super stable." But then he normally rides a KTM 690.

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Great thanks for that.

I am going to throw on the front and rear Tractionator and try them out. 
Will report on my findings.

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One more thing: Had 32 PSI in the front tire. Tire pressure may also be a factor.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I too have a WR450, and can ride that pretty agressive here in Arizona, but for me the stock tires are the limiting factor, the front wants to wash all the time! And the rear is pretty unpredictable in the slide.  I can hussle the bike down a paved twisty road really well thou, so switching tires before these pirelli's wear out isn't happening-having too much fun on the road right now!

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I found the same unhelpful traction as you write in dirt with the stock. Couldn't ride the thing with any confidence in the dirt! I really like the MotoZ Tractionator Rallz knobby front, and plan to get the same for the rear soon. Can't wait to see how much better it handles! I'll save the OEM tires for a future road trip...

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2 hours ago, Svrider said:

I too have a WR450, and can ride that pretty agressive here in Arizona, but for me the stock tires are the limiting factor, the front wants to wash all the time! And the rear is pretty unpredictable in the slide.  I can hussle the bike down a paved twisty road really well thou, so switching tires before these pirelli's wear out isn't happening-having too much fun on the road right now!

I am constantly shocked at how well i can carve on this bike with the stock tires.  We have this mountain road here above Boise, Idaho named Bogus Basin.  16 miles long, 172 curves, many of them hairpins and most curves have a very steep cliff along the side.   I ride up a dirt trail and ride along the ridge on Boise ridge road for my dirt fix after work, with the views of Boise, SW Idaho, Oregon temping my concentration as I navigate the dirt crevasses and washouts. Then, the ridge road dumps me out near the top of Boise Basin road, arms fully pumped by then. I then head down hill to navigate those narrow 172 corners going as fast as I can, fully leaned most times and I can go almost as fast as I used to navigate on my old R-6 and FZ-09. 

 

These tires arent perfect for dirt, but damn if they don't carve the pavement very well and I have learned to make them work in the dirt. As bad as I want to spoon on some Motoz tractionators, I know that they will completely suck for high speed carving. 

 

I really think 'i am going to string up a second set of wheels. One for mostly dirt, and one set for mostly pavement. 

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