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Can you pick up your bike?


Moto
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Nope. So I thought I'd see if I can pick this thing up by myself. I laid it down in my driveway (gently) with my son's help. I couldn't do it. I can't pick the thing up by myself, on level ground at least.

 

Wow - an eye-opener. Good to know for solo riding (which I like to do). What's the solution? Riding around trees I could take a rope and a pulley with me... No doubt others of you have a better idea about this when traveling solo!

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have you tried it like this young lady picking up her Harley?

(there are lots of caveats at the start of the video, but once she actually lifts?  it makes a lot more sense.)

this is how I do it.   

 

 

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Really down to technique, once you've mastered it !

some where on the tube there is  5 ft girl picking up a 1290 easily.

also there is a pole and ratchet strap device that I'm sure someone on here knows about which folds away neatly 

Edited by Matth
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Wow! Just did a Google search for how to pick up a motorcycle that has fallen, and there sure are a LOT of Harleys that fall over!!! 😂

 

Anyway, here's the way I was taught (a bit different) by the Canadian Motorcycle Safety Course.

 

Sorry, but its another Harley, but done by a stately gentleman...

 

 

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I think I have Yamaha disease...

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I will be installing a tail rack that has grab handles as part of the kit.  That should aid in picking up the bike.  I hope.  

 

OBT7RR-2T.jpg

The Outback Motortek Rear rack and passenger grab handle combo for the Yamaha Tenere 700 is and essential!

  

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Was having too much fun first day out on the T7 and was on the 4th of July trail, stopped right before a big rocky up hill on loose rocks, front tire washed out on me when I stopped. Riding alone had to pick it up alone. it was getting the tires to make contact the ground that was hard, but got it up. a few scratches on the back left side panel. I am not a big guy, 5'11, 155lb. 

Edited by Kenobe700
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I've had to pick mine up a few times on the trail, I  can do it, but it's not so easy for sure and I'm at my  limit if it's on a dodgy hill etc, one really good tip I've seen somewhere on YouTube is to have an occy strap or similar and lock the front brake off before lifting, @Moto a very good idea to have a practice lift, something I wish I'd done before my first trail drop!!

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I'll have to go out and try again with the Harley girl technique. If I can't do it, maybe she could come along with me on my rides.

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On flat ground or wheels downhill; yes, just

wheels uphill; nope, dragging it around till wheels are downhill.

It’s just more motivation to avoid dropping it.

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There is a recovery stand that I saw in one of the BMW GS forum...basically is a jack to to winch jack...

I need to find it tonight when I get home from work...AHHH!!!!

Edited by TimmyTheHog
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I managed to drop mine in the garage the first day! was moving it backwards and didn't realize the kickstand had moved back a bit, over it went when i lowered it down. I dropped a Kawasaki 1000 in college when i got off of it without putting the kickstand down. (we'd had some drinks) That was not an easy bike to pick up alone!

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I have not had to pick my T7 off the ground (yet) and I sincerely hope I can, one BIG reason I bought the T7 is to be able to pick it up from a drop, solo, otherwise there is no point in riding it as a solo adventure bike..... one drop and you have to abandon the bike where its at?   nope...

My previous ADV bike, a VFR1200XDA I picked up twice, and after the second time, literally right after picking it up solo, I decided to sell that bike, I was done with it.   

The big VFR weighed 637lbs on its own, + anything I had installed, I'm guessing ~650lbs or so curb weight. 

When I brought my T7 home, 100% stock, full of fuel, I weighed it and it came in at 455lbs.  So almost 200lbs lighter than the VFR.  I lightened up the bike some (exhaust, battery) added a bit of weight, bar, engine protectors etc.... 

 

Having said all that, I also think that technique & preparedness plays a big factor.   

There was no way to simply lift the big VFR up by its handlebars, I had to do the heavy bike technique of facing away from it, butt against the seat, walk up/back and lift.  


Being able to apply the brake and have it hold on its own is very, very important.  I suggest carrying a strap or something. 
With the vfr I lucked out, as stock, it literally has a parking brake (I had the DCT version)  first lift I forgot to apply any brake, and literally had to put the bike back down as it was rolling away from me, so I had to lift it twice (which sucked) with brake on I lifted and got the side stand down (bike fell on its left side)  

 

Hoping with ~200lbs less weight, the T7 is easier to pick up, it certainly is much easier to handle while riding.

 

To the OP, good idea trying it all out before hand.  
If in the end the bike is still too much, and you want that solo adv bike like we all do, there is no shame going with something much smaller and lighter (like I did with the VFR->T7). 

 

I really considered, and its still on my radar, a nice WR250R.  Stock they're 295lbs curb weight, there is a world of adv accessories for them (to build whatever you'd like), people have ridden them across continents, and they're very reliable machines.  


A friend of mine is going to get one this spring, I'll ride it to check it out, and may still get one to stand next to the T7 in the garage.  The WR250R could be the light weight bike for experimenting and seeing how far I can take a bike off road (learning too)

 

Cheers!

 

Tazmool

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Had to pick it up by myself today actually. The first time I dropped it landed on me! So that was a little frustrating... But had a friend video taping the whole thing. Thankfully he stopped recording to help lift it off me. 

 

Quickly getting up to lift the bike fueled with adrenaline from the crash works best for me 😉

 

These are not sand tires

20210121_115833_HDR.jpg

Edited by Tooph
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Also, if you can, do daily squat exercises...trust me, it goes a long way.

 

when i just started out off-road (somewhat), I keep on dropping my GS (thank god for the crash bar). a few time was in the soft mud/sand.

 

after that, I do 20~40 body squats daily.

 

although it didn't improve my riding, it did improve my lift bike stretch 🤣

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Excellent point on being in shape too!
I just came in from an evening walk, and I'm thinking I need to start my excercise regime again to get in shape for this season, it does make a difference. 

 

Tazmool

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99% of the time I travel alone with the motorcycle through the countryside. I have dropped it several times and I have always been able to lift it myself. Except for the last time, a couple of months ago. On that occasion the bike got stuck in the ditch and I couldn't find a way to lift it by myself because I didn't have room to put my legs and support my back on the seat. After many attempts I had to phone my son who came with the 4x4 and a friend to help me lift it.

 

During the two hours that I waited for help as it got dark, I decided I couldn't depend on having to call anyone if something like this happened to me again.

 

I bought the lift indicated by @TimmyTheHog (https://eastbound.shop/product-info/lifting-a-motorcycle-motowinch-info/) and now I am much calmer on my solo rides.

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Teneré 700 '20

WR250R '10

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Here are some videos from Megs on lifting your bike (yes, that bike weighs about 200# less than a T7)

 

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Plan B.

 

 

"Men do not quit playing because they grow old, they grow old because they quit playing" Oliver Wendell Holmes - Mods - HDB handguards, Camel-ADV Gut guard, 1 finger clutch, The Fix pedal & Rally pipe, RR side/tail rack, RR 90nm spring & Headlight guard, Rally seat, OEM heated grips- stablemate Beta 520RS

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I'm 5'4" 125lbs and can pick mine up. I think it's a lot technique, explode with legs stepping into it. I usually grip the handle bars with one hand turned into the tank and grip mid way down like the rear foot peg hanger with the other. With that being said the bike is a little big for me and likely won't be keeping it long term.

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i like Hammerhead's comment about needing to rotate the bike till ya can get it properly positioned.

On my smaller bikes, I have "Tugger" lift straps.  Which?  first time I saw, I of course made fun of my pal, and the whole, "who would EVER need a strap with a handle" - and "if you paid attention to your riding, instead of having a tug"  .. blah blah blah

Then!  I helped him pickup his bike after a fall,  and realized - these are brilliant tools - and have them on most of my offroad bikes now.

I haven't looked to see if there is one that's tenere sized,  but front forks would be nice for sure.
 


 

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first time i had to pick mine off off road i realized it was difficult, i had no crash bars or anything. The T7 lays down FLAT. My S10 at least leaned over at a good angle with the crash bars and hard bags, put your butt in the seat and walk it up. The T7 was so low i could not get my butt in the seat, i would have been sitting on the ground. 

 

Got it picked up by just grabbing the end of the handlebar but it felt just as heavy as my s10, probably b/c it feel down farther and I had longer to go to pick it up 🙂

 

Mike

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Not had to yet, but since I could pick up my Super Tenere (unfortunately, I did have experience with that 😕!), I don’t think I’ll have a problem under any reasonable situation.

 

I do have some weight training exercises that are lumped under the general category of “Picking Up My Dropped Motorcycle”! 😄

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