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Packing food and water for overnight.


DT675
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We have our 1st ever overnight trip coming up.  I’ve been going crazy trying to figure out what I need to bring. 
 

A couple of the items i seem to be having trouble wrapping my mind around is food and water. I plan to bring a very small soft cooler with a few bottles of water and small ice pack.  I can make a couple stops to replenish the water but surely the ice pack will be warm by the first days end. What do you do for water? Drink up what you have and bear with having warm water on the consecutive days?

 

Food. What do you do for food? I barley have any extra room for food at all but thankfully my buddy will be bringing most the main food. But I don’t think either of us has fully considered what to bring, how to “keep” it and how to keep it from bears and raccoons etc?

 

I'm nervous about water and food for just 2 days! I know many of you camp for several days and weeks or more. 

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I'd replace the water with beer and drink it before the ice goes, then put up with warm water...

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You're definitely over thinking it if you think warm water is bad.

I eat non perishables when out of the way for a few days, then just have a nice pub meal when I'm in a town.

I like Spam. Plenty of nutrition, and volumetrically efficient.

Jerky is also good.

Noodles, rice etc are easy to cook. Rice is especially space efficient.

It's not glamorous, but at least I'm not eating the moths that fly into the camp fire 🙂

Keep it simple I say. You're only away from civilization for 2 days. You could eat absolutely nothing and you would still survive.

A healthy human can go up to 30 days before they will die of starvation. Though obviously at that point they will be very weak. A fat person should last longer.

 

 

 

 

 

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CousCous, just need boiling water and packs up in plastic bags. Pre make sandwiches and freeze them. Freeze water in containers that collapse to help keep any perishables. Canned fish, potatoes and onions  keep well. 2 minute noodles. Flat bread takes little room. 

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Or expedition food where you just add water.

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5 hours ago, Hogan said:

A fat person should last longer.

 

Hands up everyone that this applies to......✋

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36 minutes ago, electric_monk said:

A fat person should last longer.

 

Plus we stay warmer on cold rides. It takes 36 hours for my core temperature to drop three degrees (fahrenheit).

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I usually pack 2 liters of water in my luggage and have a 2 liter camelbag in my jacket. 
so far never had a problem but here in Europe maybe it’s less of a problem as there is basically always a town or a source of water so could do less than 4 but I get thirsty 🥸

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1 hour ago, qInvention said:

Or expedition food where you just add water.

Can you add beer to " expedition " food?

Because I thought we were taking beer instead of water, because the  water gonna go warm....

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Tick the question answered box!

 

Screenshot_20210601-225539.png

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warm water, warm beer, freeze dried food, beef jerkey

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I usually bring a couple cans of my favorite Campbell's Chunky Soups/ beans/ chili (you can heat them up directly on backpacker's single burner unit), eggs in those 4ea plastic egg plastic holders (AMZ), bacon, Gatorade (remember to bring inside tent before you turn in, piss bottle for the guys), a couple Camelback bladders with water for riding, Pop-Tarts, crackers, Snickers, beef jerky, lots of different condiment packets from fast food joints, salt/pepper, don't forget  the plates/bowls/eating utensils, compact camping cookware kit for frying/reheating/boiling water, fuel for burner, coffee, insulated sealable tumbler, large insulated jugs (for water), trash bags.

 

Don't forget the handi wipes for cleaning up and  I use for TP, prescriptions, bug spray, sun tan lotion, bear spray, a couple of LED flashlight/lantern. I don't do ice, I use those freezable gel packs (they last longer).

 

I'll camp for several days like this and they all fit in my 58L top box, and 37L panniers. Keep the heavy stuff down low. The tent, Travelchair , cookware, etc go into a med duffel bag and get strapped to the pillion or on top of the cases. ROK Straps FTW, you can never have too many.

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What travel chair do you have ?

 

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17 minutes ago, Stevoh said:

What travel chair do you have ?

 

 

Travelchair Joey Chair, Portable, Compact

 

61kNReY4ciL._AC_SL1200_.jpg

 

They are not cheap, but they are very worth it. They fold up small and setup very quickly. All my ADV pals have these. Packs small enough for moto-camping. They are very comfy for the size.

 

If you don't care about the color, some of the slower selling colors sell for a bit cheaper. Look out for discontinued colors as they are usually heavily discounted.

 

I'm 6'2" and 225 lbs, even with my riding gear on I fit into it just fine.

 

They sit higher than many portable folding chair, so they're easy to get in and get out.

 

They have a wide base on each leg, so they don't sink into the sand like other chairs.

 

 

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Posted (edited)

There are cheap copy/clones of these chairs. But they are not as durable. The plastic piece where all the aluminum poles come together always break.

 

Get the original. made by TravelChair - Joey chair. It supports up to 300 lbs.

 

 

Edited by REDHORSECA
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6 hours ago, Louis said:

CousCous, just need boiling water and packs up in plastic bags. Pre make sandwiches and freeze them. Freeze water in containers that collapse to help keep any perishables. Canned fish, potatoes and onions  keep well. 2 minute noodles. Flat bread takes little room. 

 

I also tend to prefer couscous over rice or pasta. It requires less water and once you have poured boiling water over it, it can be set aside to swell while you cook your meat and sauce. The only other food I carry from home is as backup (spam, canned fish, some oats, some instant coffee sticks, ...). All other stuff is bought fresh on the day. Even in the middle of f$cking nowhere Russia I've always managed to pass by at least a small village shop at some point during the day. There are occasions where the backup food I brought from home becomes the meal on the last day of camping because I simple didn't need it along the way.

 

As for water, I carry a 3L hydration bladder with water, usually with some rehydration salts mixed in. Depending on the weather and temperatures it's complemented with a 2L bottle of water. That usually serves me for drinking, cooking, doing the dishes and brushing my teeth. Never bothered with a cooler or anything like that. But I do try to fill up the hydration bladder with refrigerated water from a shop or a cold mountain stream. It keeps cool for a good few hours. After that it's warm, I don't mind.

 

If I pass a shop closely before planning to set up camp, I do pick up a beer or 2. In other circumstances carrying a small flask of Pastis or Mastika is nice because you just dilute it with water. Warm pastis or warm water is ok, warm beer not so much.

 

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@DT675 You didn't mention what type of luggage you're using, but mentioned you barely have enough extra room left over for food. Don't take this wrong,  but you're carrying too much non essential " stuff" if you don't have room for food.  That said, there is nothing wrong with sharing the load with your traveling buddy.  Your load laid out on the garage floor is a good way to assess the extra " crap" that you need to leave behind. I'm one of the worst at over packing and for a 3 day, 2 night moto camping trip on my Beta dirt bike, I was able to stuff everything I needed in a Mosko R40 setup. Granted I had stuff strapped on top and extra Molle bags for water, but I had everything I needed. If you're using hard bags, you should have even more room than I had, so you'll need to pare down your list.

Here's my packing list for that trip and packing location in my R40.  You'll see that I had 3L of water for meals, plus the 100oz. I carried in my Backpack hydration bladder.  I also had a water filtration pump for extra water, if needed to replenish along the trail. We ran into hotter than anticipated temperatures and swung by a gas station for fuel and extra water so the pump wasn't actually used on that trip. Food was jerky, granola bars and nuts for trail snacks,  dehydrated food packs for dinner. Instant oatmeal, coffee for breakfast,  oh and don't forget a mosquito hood. We ended up having to eat in our tents one night, too many spoonfuls of beef stroganoff with mosquitoes mixed in! 

My advice is, combine your tool kits, take unique tools specific to your bike and eliminate duplicate stuff.  Have a blast and be sure to report back how it went.

 

JW Mosko Moto R40 pack list Packing Location   Tool list
  Spot locator Back Pack   Tools in RH Molle bag
  compass Back Pack   Zip Ties
  Cell ph & charging cord/Spare Batt Back Pack   Disposable Gloves
  knife Back Pack   Tire Gauge
  hat Back Pack   21" Tube
  sunglasses Back Pack   End Wrenches
  sunscreen Back Pack   Tire Patched & Glue
  TP Goggle Pocket   Tire Irons (3)
  Baby wipes Goggle Pocket   Honda Multi Tool
  waterproof matches Goggle Pocket   CO2
  Headlamp & Flashlight Goggle Pocket   Epoxy Repair
  first aid kit JJ   Extra Screws
  Fuel Bottle LH Bottom pocket   Air Compressor *
  Sleep Pad LH Lower bag    
  sleeping bag LH Lower bag    
  water bottles (2 Smart Water 1.5L ea.) LH Molle bag   Field Work Side stand
  Camp shoes Outside Molle bags    
  Camp Chair RH Bottom pocket    
  Tent/Groundcloth RH Lower bag   Leatherman
  pillow RH Lower bag    
  1 long sleeve poly shirt RH Lower bag    
  2 short sleeve poly shirts RH Lower bag    
  Zip off leg pants RH Lower bag    
  3pr syn socks RH Lower bag    
  Air Compressor RH Lower bag *    
  gloves RH Molle bag    
  stove fuel Stinger 22   Electrical Tape
  food Stinger 22   Master Link
  Water filtration pump Stinger 22    
  stove & Lighter (inside Cook set) Stinger 22    
  rain gear (Jacket liner) Stinger 22    
  toiletries/soap Stinger 22    
  Swimsuit Stinger 22    
  Towel Stinger 22    
  water purification Stinger 22    
  utensils/cookware/food plate Stinger 22    
  GPS on bike and phone Tank bag    
  Meds Toiletries in Stinger 22    
  can opener - Leatherman Tools in RH Molle bag    
  pepper spray      
  Riding Gear Bag      
  DS helmet & Goggles      
  Pants, Jacket, liners      
  Gloves      
  Protective Gear      
  Boots      
  Trailer Tool Bag      
  rev. 7/31/2019      

 

20190718_105152.jpg

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Don't forget RTV and JB Weld. An extra quart of oil, just in case.

 

On of my rides at Joshua Tree, CA just a couple months ago. 2 of 3 ADV bikes were abandoned in the desert to be picked up the next day. KTM with transmission issue (a local rider, hitched a ride back to town in a passing 4x4 truck), BMW with a crack oil pan (hitched a ride to town in a passing Jeep Wrangler), and a Super Tenere also with a cracked oil pan (poorly design bash plate). They were ridding through a rock, boulder field in a washout like they were on dirt bikes. We were able to tow the S10 out to civilization.

 

x0flDrY.jpg

 

This was the day after to retrieve the bike. Trying some JB Weld and a couple quarts of oil.

uF1ZB3G.jpg

 

BMW F800 GS towing the S10 with Buddy Strap, 15 miles into nearest gas station. They both crashed more than a dozen times towing, through the deep sands and washouts.

WtIygmP.jpg

 

He called a buddy to rescue him once again.

hqkvKEa.jpg

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Forgot the most important thing: Snickers, always carry Snickers 😅

it's my goto in case of an energy dip on the trail. Dried fruits en nuts do the trick as well, but those are just too healthy.

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I have yet to go moto camping, but I expect I will pack similarly to when I go back country backpacking. Is there going to be a fresh water stream near where you are? I generally only bring 1-2L of water for "emergencies" and cook with nearby stream water and use it to fill my LifeStraw bottle for regular drinking. For food, I tend to pack oatmeal, instant noodles, or dehydrated meals if I'm feeling wealthy. Throw in some jerky, nuts, etc. I don't bring a cooler or anything cold. If there is a stream nearby, leave your drinks in the shade in the stream and they'll keep cool enough. It might not be necessary to pack as light as I would, but I figure the lighter the better. I don't want my bike to be a 600lbs mountain on wheels.

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However much water you are planning on carrying, double it.

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Wow, lots of great advise! Thanks! I’ve got a little thinking to do.  
 

Ive got 15L soft side bags, a 35L top bag and tank bag. So not much. I was hoping to just get a night or 2 out of this set up. I could also bring my Klim backpack and add in the water bladder but I’m really hoping not to have a backpack at all if I can help it. 
 

This week I’ve been pecking away at putting tools on the bike so to keep them out of the luggage. So far that’s going pretty well. I think after this thread I’ve got some better water/ food ideas now. I think this bike is going to need a rear rack in the future too. 

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Posted (edited)
14 hours ago, REDHORSECA said:

There are cheap copy/clones of these chairs. But they are not as durable. The plastic piece where all the aluminum poles come together always break.

 

Get the original. made by TravelChair - Joey chair. It supports up to 300 lbs.

 

 

All this talk of warm water has made me thirsty, but of course one needs to be relaxed and comfortable while enjoying a Motorcycle Expedition Camping Experience, great thanks to REDHORSECA for his travel chair input, I had only just recently been pondering this issue, I found this on AliExpress.

I realise they may not be as durable as the aforementioned.

 

 

Screenshot_20210602-170113.png

Screenshot_20210602-064204.png

Edited by Stevoh
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When my T700 didn't arrive on time for the Labor Day week '20 XL ADV Rally at Mammoth Lake, CA I took my Versys instead.

 

s5zz1Zzl.jpg

 

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The VerSys actually did quite well. I was able to keep up with the much capable KTMs & BMWs. I just couldn't go as fast in the really rough terrains with the reduced suspension travel.

 

0u3YM0Tl.jpg

 

jQWGihZl.jpg

 

The same Givi top box and panniers fit onto the T7.

 

I'm surprised to find no photos of the T7 with all my moto camping gear on, the following rally at Anza-Borrego Desert State Park @ November 2020. My first moto camping trip on the T7.

 

p7i6A4ul.mp4

 

3rGLp5Rl.jpg

 

91sw1w9l.jpg

 

 

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