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How to measure/set rider sag?


TeabagInsurance
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Hey all,

 

A couple weeks ago I put in a stiffer rear spring (90nm K-tech) and am now working on dialing in the damping and sag for the rear shock.

 

I understand the concepts and differences between the different damping adjustments and what sag is, as well as how to adjust them all, but I'm wondering how to actually go about doing it on the T7. The stiffer spring still has the same amount of travel I imagine, so I'm still aiming for for the same percentage of spring travel for my rider sag, right? What percentage should I be aiming for if I ride hard on both dirt and street? How do I actually go about measuring what the sag is on the bike? Should I be measuring from two specific points? i.e. the seat to the rear axle bolt or something?

 

First time making this kind of adjustment if that wasn't obvious.

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2 hours ago, Landshark said:

Watch this video.  It worked for me.

 

 

That makes total sense, thank you! 30% rider sag is generally what I had heard too, glad to see that lines up.

Edited by TeabagInsurance
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So apparently I'm on crack. I go to set my sag today and even with the preload dialed all the way back, I'm still short about 7mm of the 63mm target. The only explanation is that my spring is too stiff, but how can that be? I already picked the correct spring rate on the new spring!

 

*checks K-tech website and sees 90nm is rated for 265-285lbs*

 

Oh... so apparently I did not in fact order the correct spring rate for my weight (205lbs). I don't know if I simply had a stroke while ordering or what. It's not really feasible to return it at this point with the conversion rates, shipping, and import fees. I guess I'll just stick with this. 56mm sag gives me 26.6% which hopefully isn't that far off the target 30%... plus I've almost got an empty gas tank? When I go moto camping I probably have another 40lbs+ of stuff as well.

 

So what I'm trying to say, is I'm an idiot.

Edited by TeabagInsurance
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I would not be worried at all.  30% is not a hard and fast number.  25% to 35% is a general range and 30% is a good place to start.  You will find many who like to be on the lower end in terms of sag.

 

Rear wheel travel is 200mm not 210.  56/200= 28% so you are closer than you think.  

 

The bonus is you are not relying on the remote adjuster to get your sag correct and you have full adjustment remaining to accommodate added weight for passenger or luggage if that is in your future.

 

I always try to get my bikes setup with minimal or no added preload by a hydraulic adjuster to get proper sag.  Preload adjusters can and do fail eventually.  They also need maintenance (oil/seals changed) just like the shock.

 

 For example If you were running the stock spring you would need the preload adjuster fully wound in to get close to proper sag.  What would you do if on a long trip and the remote adjuster started to leak and you lost the 10mm from the preload the adjuster?  

It would really suck to try and finish a long trip with the resulting sag numbers, and when you get home you are left needing to find a suspension shop that can service the remote adjuster.

IMO you have the perfect setup by not relying on a hydraulic adjuster to get  proper sag.

 

I am 225lbs with a 90N spring and need 5 clicks on the adjuster to get my 30%.  I will be making and installing a spacer this winter to enable me to run with 0 clicks on the adjuster.  Hydraulic adjusters are convienent but I would rather have a simple threaded adjuster any day.  

 

Find something else to worry about, your shock is fine.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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50 minutes ago, TeabagInsurance said:

So apparently I'm on crack. I go to set my sag today and even with the preload dialed all the way back, I'm still short about 7mm of the 63mm target. The only explanation is that my spring is too stiff, but how can that be? I already picked the correct spring rate on the new spring!

 

*checks K-tech website and sees 90nm is rated for 265-285lbs*

 

Oh... so apparently I did not in fact order the correct spring rate for my weight (205lbs). I don't know if I simply had a stroke while ordering or what. It's not really feasible to return it at this point with the conversion rates, shipping, and import fees. I guess I'll just stick with this. 56mm sag gives me 26.6% which hopefully isn't that far off the target 30%... plus I've almost got an empty gas tank? When I go moto camping I probably have another 40lbs+ of stuff as well.

 

So what I'm trying to say, is I'm an idiot.

You might find once kitted up you'll be absolutely fine.  You could have accidentally bought the right spring! 

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YouTube - RIDER GUIDER - check out my T7 playlist and say hello 😀 

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25 minutes ago, williestreet said:

I would not be worried at all.  30% is not a hard and fast number.  25% to 35% is a general range and 30% is a good place to start.  You will find many who like to be on the lower end in terms of sag.

 

Rear wheel travel is 200mm not 210.  56/200= 28% so you are closer than you think.  

 

The bonus is you are not relying on the remote adjuster to get your sag correct and you have full adjustment remaining to accommodate added weight for passenger or luggage if that is in your future.

 

I always try to get my bikes setup with minimal or no added preload by a hydraulic adjuster to get proper sag.  Preload adjusters can and do fail eventually.  They also need maintenance (oil/seals changed) just like the shock.

 

 For example If you were running the stock spring you would need the preload adjuster fully wound in to get close to proper sag.  What would you do if on a long trip and the remote adjuster started to leak and you lost the 10mm from the preload the adjuster?  

It would really suck to try and finish a long trip with the resulting sag numbers, and when you get home you are left needing to find a suspension shop that can service the remote adjuster.

IMO you have the perfect setup by not relying on a hydraulic adjuster to get  proper sag.

 

I am 225lbs with a 90N spring and need 5 clicks on the adjuster to get my 30%.  I will be making and installing a spacer this winter to enable me to run with 0 clicks on the adjuster.  Hydraulic adjusters are convienent but I would rather have a simple threaded adjuster any day.  

 

Find something else to worry about, your shock is fine.

Thanks for the input. I wasn't terribly concerned, but it looks like I am pretty well set up then, so that's a bit of a relief. I've only had a passenger with the stock spring (with default preload and damping) and it was god awful. I don't plan on riding a lot of two up, but on occasion I will. I do plan on doing quite a bit of moto camping, however, so I'm certainly glad I have wiggle room in the right direction.

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And never trust what websites tell you are the proper spring rates for certain weight riders.  

Racetech has got to be the worst in terms of selecting spring rates.  

Everyone  likes the convenience of their rate calculator, but anytime I have used it to check another bike or application has been terribly wrong.

Check 3 or 4 different sites you will get 3-4 different answers.

 

Asking  other riders first for their specific numbers is a much better idea.  

 

 

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11 hours ago, TeabagInsurance said:

So apparently I'm on crack. I go to set my sag today and even with the preload dialed all the way back, I'm still short about 7mm of the 63mm target. The only explanation is that my spring is too stiff, but how can that be? I already picked the correct spring rate on the new spring!

 

*checks K-tech website and sees 90nm is rated for 265-285lbs*

 

Oh... so apparently I did not in fact order the correct spring rate for my weight (205lbs). I don't know if I simply had a stroke while ordering or what. It's not really feasible to return it at this point with the conversion rates, shipping, and import fees. I guess I'll just stick with this. 56mm sag gives me 26.6% which hopefully isn't that far off the target 30%... plus I've almost got an empty gas tank? When I go moto camping I probably have another 40lbs+ of stuff as well.

 

So what I'm trying to say, is I'm an idiot.

 

The K-Tech springs are longer than OEM, and we have found although the spring rate vs rider weight is thereabouts, because the springs are a bit longer, they always come up too hard on Rider Sag

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15 hours ago, RIDER GUIDER said:

You might find once kitted up you'll be absolutely fine.  You could have accidentally bought the right spring! 

Ye general kit & camelbak is 10-12kg 

add some tools on the bike you will probably be bang on with 0 pre load

and a fresh spring will break in a very small amount 

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