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Tazmool

Tubeless rim options for the Tenere?

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Tazmool

That is exactly the type of situation I want to avoid, having to replace the tube, or patch the tube, or remove the rim, towing, due to a simple nail in the tire.   

IF there is major damage to the rim, or tire, then sure, I'd slap a tube in there and go through the motions, but a simple puncture?  no thanks!  

KTM puts tubeless rims/tires on their 790, 1090, 1190, 1290, R and S adventure bikes.  The new AT is available with tubeless rims.... 
IF you need a tube, you can install one in a tubeless rim/tire setup, so bring a set for your adventure.

The T7 is not a WR250 or WR450, its is NOT a dirt-bike, it needs tubeless rims, and I hope in the future Gen Yamaha T7, Yamaha offers a factory set of SS poked, tubeless rims for the T7 that swap directly onto the current gen T7.

Tazmool

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Murska
1 hour ago, FredBasset said:

 

Hi Murska, what manufacture is that new rim and where did you buy it from? Cheers

I haven't changed the rim yet, maybe later ... maybe to the next bike ...😊

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roy826
12 minutes ago, Tazmool said:

That is exactly the type of situation I want to avoid, having to replace the tube, or patch the tube, or remove the rim, towing, due to a simple nail in the tire.   

IF there is major damage to the rim, or tire, then sure, I'd slap a tube in there and go through the motions, but a simple puncture?  no thanks!  

KTM puts tubeless rims/tires on their 790, 1090, 1190, 1290, R and S adventure bikes.  The new AT is available with tubeless rims.... 
IF you need a tube, you can install one in a tubeless rim/tire setup, so bring a set for your adventure.

The T7 is not a WR250 or WR450, its is NOT a dirt-bike, it needs tubeless rims, and I hope in the future Gen Yamaha T7, Yamaha offers a factory set of SS poked, tubeless rims for the T7 that swap directly onto the current gen T7.

Tazmool

While I don't disagree with what your're saying. I have been riding a long time some 45 years total and this was only my 2nd flat. Yes it could happen at any time or anywhere but even tubeless gets the right puncture in the right place on the tire and no plug will work, seen that happen more times than I've actually had a flat on  a motorcycle. I have a AT with tube type wheels and do tote two tubes and tools both of which I plan to simply swap over to the T7 when I ride it. I haven't done it yet because I was waiting on a tail rack to come in which it arrived saturday. I just did not have it with me sunday. Would not have mattered 6 miles from home I am not working on my bike on the side of the road when I have a No-Mar tire changer at my house.

 

I also have AMA roadside service here in the states and with one call I am off the side of the road and can repair the puncture at a safer location than on the side of the road. A flat is something I simply do not give much thought to or worry about. I have a friend with a AT and he spent $2k in tubeless rims just because he had one flat recently. Like I said some worry but I do not.

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ScorpionT16
Posted (edited)
29 minutes ago, Tazmool said:

That is exactly the type of situation I want to avoid, having to replace the tube, or patch the tube, or remove the rim, towing, due to a simple nail in the tire.   

IF there is major damage to the rim, or tire, then sure, I'd slap a tube in there and go through the motions, but a simple puncture?  no thanks!  

KTM puts tubeless rims/tires on their 790, 1090, 1190, 1290, R and S adventure bikes.  The new AT is available with tubeless rims.... 
IF you need a tube, you can install one in a tubeless rim/tire setup, so bring a set for your adventure.

The T7 is not a WR250 or WR450, its is NOT a dirt-bike, it needs tubeless rims, and I hope in the future Gen Yamaha T7, Yamaha offers a factory set of SS poked, tubeless rims for the T7 that swap directly onto the current gen T7.

Tazmool

 

Exact reason I went tubeless. 

spacer.png

 

I did the OutEx conversion a few weeks back, almost 3k and no issues, not even 1psi loss, lots of off-road, hwy, and wet weather use. Not having tubes feels so much better in terms of peace of mind, it took me almost an hr to get the rear wheel of and bead broken at home, would not want to try that on the trail or roadside. I couldn't even spoon the Dunlop Trailmax Missions on, went to a garage, so stiff they can probably run flat, taking those off would be even harder 

 

Edited by ScorpionT16
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Simmons1

You must be blessed. I have been riding more than 50 years., and I don't have enough fingers and toes to count how many flats I have had.  I guess tolerance for changing tubes depends how far you venture from home and how much your time is worth.  If you were on a road trip in a place where this is no cell service, and you are a lot farther than 6 miles from the house, or it was at night, or stormy, being able to quickly repair a flat can be very important.  In the last couple years or so, I have fixed flats, on my WR250R, S10, AT and Gold Wing. 

 

After the first flat on the AT, I made the wheels on my AT tubless for $125 using the Outex kit. A plugable flat gets you back on the road in 10 minutes.  I still carry tubes for the S10 and AT when travel where dirt is involved  in case of an unplugable hole or bent wheel from hitting a rock, sharp edge or big hole when riding on dirt. YMMV

 

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Tenere 700 / Africa Twin / Goldwing / Super Tenere / WR250R / KLR650 / GS1000S / GT750 / H2 750 / H1 500

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Tazmool

I do have a Outex kit waiting to be installed on my bike, at the end of the season, it will go on.  
Good to hear that people on here have done the same conversion and are happy with it. 

 

And I agree, if you don't stray far from the beaten path, and you're ok with towing your bike somewhere after you get a flat, or ripping the bike apart just for the enjoyment of ripping the wheels off it to fix a nail puncture, then tubes are great 😉   
All joking aside, I dont' understand Yamahas choice with this, and its my only peeve with the T7. 

Only thing I can think of is its got to be some kind of cost saving measure. 

 

Yesterday I was not far from home, but riding (for the 1s time ever) on a ATV trail, it was fun as heck!  and I was solo.  I guarantee you cannot get any tow vehicle in there, the trail was too narrow even for a 4x4 jeep.  I was not worried about a puncture and tubed tires, but would hate to be stuck there, ripping off a wheel, because something punctured the tire.

 

Tazmool

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FredBasset
1 hour ago, roy826 said:

While I don't disagree with what your're saying. I have been riding a long time some 45 years total and this was only my 2nd flat. Yes it could happen at any time or anywhere but even tubeless gets the right puncture in the right place on the tire and no plug will work, seen that happen more times than I've actually had a flat on  a motorcycle. I have a AT with tube type wheels and do tote two tubes and tools both of which I plan to simply swap over to the T7 when I ride it. I haven't done it yet because I was waiting on a tail rack to come in which it arrived saturday. I just did not have it with me sunday. Would not have mattered 6 miles from home I am not working on my bike on the side of the road when I have a No-Mar tire changer at my house.

 

I also have AMA roadside service here in the states and with one call I am off the side of the road and can repair the puncture at a safer location than on the side of the road. A flat is something I simply do not give much thought to or worry about. I have a friend with a AT and he spent $2k in tubeless rims just because he had one flat recently. Like I said some worry but I do not.

Ive had the misfortune of two punctures in recent times, thankfully I had tubeless wheels, so a quick fix. The very reason I’d convert with either Outex kit or 3M 4412 tape and TPMS. 

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29er
Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, ScorpionT16 said:

 

Exact reason I went tubeless. 

spacer.png

 

I did the OutEx conversion a few weeks back, almost 3k and no issues, not even 1psi loss, lots of off-road, hwy, and wet weather use. Not having tubes feels so much better in terms of peace of mind, it took me almost an hr to get the rear wheel of and bead broken at home, would not want to try that on the trail or roadside. I couldn't even spoon the Dunlop Trailmax Missions on, went to a garage, so stiff they can probably run flat, taking those off would be even harder 

 

If you have a center stand - put the bike on the center stand and put a strap or something from the stand to the front wheel so that it cant roll off it - put your wheel on the floor next to the bike and pull the side stand out, then just tip the bike sideways so that the side stand pushes the tyre breaking the bead, turn the wheel and repeat - i used to do this with my 1200GS and the 800. Works a treat at bead breaking and you can do it on the road if you had to. I watched it here years ago and have done it ever since. You can do this tubes or tubeless.

 

Edited by 29er
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JDCooper
Posted (edited)

Not to confuse the issue even more...but what about the standard tubed tire with slime (or similar) IN THE TUBE to prevent nail/screw - type flats.  The tube would prevent the mess slime makes in the interior of the tire, and plug the tube when penetrated.  Somebody must have tried this.....

Edited by JDCooper
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Colddog
16 hours ago, JDCooper said:

Not to confuse the issue even more...but what about the standard tubed tire with slime (or similar) IN THE TUBE to prevent nail/screw - type flats.  The tube would prevent the mess slime makes in the interior of the tire, and plug the tube when penetrated.  Somebody must have tried this.....

I wonder about this as well, following.

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ScorpionT16
Posted (edited)
17 hours ago, JDCooper said:

Not to confuse the issue even more...but what about the standard tubed tire with slime (or similar) IN THE TUBE to prevent nail/screw - type flats.  The tube would prevent the mess slime makes in the interior of the tire, and plug the tube when penetrated.  Somebody must have tried this.....

 

 

its been done and works

Edited by ScorpionT16
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Ktmmitch

This is damage from the high alkaline content of some of the cheaper tyre sealants, used on a tubeless Africa twin wheel kit...........I prefer to only recommend puncture sealant with tubed wheels, tubeless punctures are so easy to fix, and most tyre sealants cause the wheel to become unbalanced. And if you try and plug a tubeless tyre that has had sealant inside, generally the plug doesn't want to seal.

Front 1.jpg

Rear 4.jpg

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Darrenheli

I have used www.bikeseal.co.uk

No issues so far and their isn't anything to cause corrosion and no issues with wheel balance

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Allen Kelly
On 7/28/2020 at 7:57 AM, JDCooper said:

Not to confuse the issue even more...but what about the standard tubed tire with slime (or similar) IN THE TUBE to prevent nail/screw - type flats.  The tube would prevent the mess slime makes in the interior of the tire, and plug the tube when penetrated.  Somebody must have tried this.....

I have used slime successfully on a number of bikes and find it does a great job unless you get a tear in the tube from stuff like fencing wire. That becomes a different story all together. For this reason I carry spare tubes in my kit. Cheers

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Canzvt
On 7/27/2020 at 7:34 AM, ScorpionT16 said:

 

Exact reason I went tubeless. 

spacer.png

 

I did the OutEx conversion a few weeks back, almost 3k and no issues, not even 1psi loss, lots of off-road, hwy, and wet weather use. Not having tubes feels so much better in terms of peace of mind, it took me almost an hr to get the rear wheel of and bead broken at home, would not want to try that on the trail or roadside. I couldn't even spoon the Dunlop Trailmax Missions on, went to a garage, so stiff they can probably run flat, taking those off would be even harder 

 

Well, just returned from a 3000km trip into the southern British Columbia back country with my Outex fitted wheels. Good news and bad news. The good news is that both the front and back wheel/tire did exactly what I wanted/needed a tubeless tire to do. Stay on the rims. Pressures down to 25psi and up to 40 (TPMS fitted). The bad news, I took a 6 inch spike into the rear tire at an angle. Pulled it out, and plugged it. Simple! However a couple of days later one spoke leaked on the rear wheel which we couldn't repair trailside, so after preparing the inside of the rear tire to remove most of the plug, we fitted the OEM tube I had with me (for such an occasion) and rode another 1400kms home over 2 days and LOTS of rocky back roads. BTW Motion Pro's bead breaker worked marvelously on my E-07's with a bit of work.

 

Haven't had the chance to investigate the spoke leaking issue yet, as work is getting in the way, but will report back when I figure out what went wrong.

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I think I have Yamaha disease...

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FredBasset

I wonder if tyre sealant might of helped in that situation, with the spoke leaking?

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Simmons1
8 hours ago, Canzvt said:

Well, just returned from a 3000km trip into the southern British Columbia back country with my Outex fitted wheels. Good news and bad news. The good news is that both the front and back wheel/tire did exactly what I wanted/needed a tubeless tire to do. Stay on the rims. Pressures down to 25psi and up to 40 (TPMS fitted). The bad news, I took a 6 inch spike into the rear tire at an angle. Pulled it out, and plugged it. Simple! However a couple of days later one spoke leaked on the rear wheel which we couldn't repair trailside, so after preparing the inside of the rear tire to remove most of the plug, we fitted the OEM tube I had with me (for such an occasion) and rode another 1400kms home over 2 days and LOTS of rocky back roads. BTW Motion Pro's bead breaker worked marvelously on my E-07's with a bit of work.

 

Haven't had the chance to investigate the spoke leaking issue yet, as work is getting in the way, but will report back when I figure out what went wrong.

I had a leaking spoke a couple thousand miles after installing Outex on my Africa Twin on a trip. Put a tube in and finished my trip. Got lazy and left the tube in until it was time to change the tire. Running the bike with the tube putting uniform  pressure on the Outex layers pushed out all of the little imperfections in the tape that I created installing it.  I put the new tire on tubeless with no leaks. Several thousand miles on the new tire and all is good still.

 

You may pull the tube and find the leak is sealed with no other action required other than to pull the tube.

 

I plan on doing the Outex on the T7 while the suspension is set out to be resprung and revalved.  Since I have some waiting time, I plan on installing the Outex, putting a tube in and mounting the tire to help push out any imperfections in my tape job while the suspension is out. When the suspension comes back I'll pull the tubes and put the wheels back on tubless. Its a little more work but worth the piece of mind for me.

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Tenere 700 / Africa Twin / Goldwing / Super Tenere / WR250R / KLR650 / GS1000S / GT750 / H2 750 / H1 500

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ScorpionT16
10 hours ago, Canzvt said:

Well, just returned from a 3000km trip into the southern British Columbia back country with my Outex fitted wheels. Good news and bad news. The good news is that both the front and back wheel/tire did exactly what I wanted/needed a tubeless tire to do. Stay on the rims. Pressures down to 25psi and up to 40 (TPMS fitted). The bad news, I took a 6 inch spike into the rear tire at an angle. Pulled it out, and plugged it. Simple! However a couple of days later one spoke leaked on the rear wheel which we couldn't repair trailside, so after preparing the inside of the rear tire to remove most of the plug, we fitted the OEM tube I had with me (for such an occasion) and rode another 1400kms home over 2 days and LOTS of rocky back roads. BTW Motion Pro's bead breaker worked marvelously on my E-07's with a bit of work.

 

Haven't had the chance to investigate the spoke leaking issue yet, as work is getting in the way, but will report back when I figure out what went wrong.

 

Good to know, will carry a spare tube too from now, thanks 🙂 - How do you know it was a spoke that leaked and not a leak from the trail side repair/plug, or the bead of the tire later on? Maybe just apply some marine silicone to the outside of the leaked spoke and see how that holds

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Simmons1
1 hour ago, ScorpionT16 said:

 

Good to know, will carry a spare tube too from now, thanks 🙂 - How do you know it was a spoke that leaked and not a leak from the trail side repair/plug, or the bead of the tire later on? Maybe just apply some marine silicone to the outside of the leaked spoke and see how that holds

On my AT, I spun the wheel didn't see anything puncturing the tire, and then poured water on the spokes while spinning wheel and saw bubbles. 


Tenere 700 / Africa Twin / Goldwing / Super Tenere / WR250R / KLR650 / GS1000S / GT750 / H2 750 / H1 500

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Canzvt
2 hours ago, ScorpionT16 said:

 

Good to know, will carry a spare tube too from now, thanks 🙂 - How do you know it was a spoke that leaked and not a leak from the trail side repair/plug, or the bead of the tire later on? Maybe just apply some marine silicone to the outside of the leaked spoke and see how that holds

Ya, as Simmons1 says above, made some soapy water using shampoo and a water bottle, and sure enough, it was a spoke. Will try to rip it down this weekend, and figure it out. Also, great tip from Simmons1 using the tube to seat everything. Will give that a go.


I think I have Yamaha disease...

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Hammerhead
On 1/1/2020 at 5:26 PM, Tazmool said:

Maybe I'm wrong, but I always thought that if you have a tubeless rim and tubeless tire, and suffer damage to the tire that cannot be easily repaired, you could always slip a tube in there and be on your way?   (ie use a tube in a tubeless setup to get you to the next town/shop and repair the tire there)  

So, running a tubeless setup with a set of spare tubes for the worst scenarios is the best of both worlds?  

Tazmool

Bingo! Tubeless eliminates pinch flats & makes most punctures FAR easier to field repair. But still doesn't relieve us from packing the required gear to 'tube up' in the worst case scenarios. This has been  my standard mountain bike game for years & has drastically reduced trail repairs & that mountain of pinched & patched tubes piled up in the shop. 

  Best of both worlds!

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med.jeeves
Posted (edited)

For those concerned with the stock front tire conversion to Outex, theres a guy on youtube (Far&Further I think) who has 10,000KM with the OEM rims and Outex tubes. He did the same conversion to a CB500X that he put 100,000 KM on. He was so impressed by the Outex system he actually has a whole video on it, I think. This guy is not easy on his bikes (completely flips the CBX in one of his videos) and he claims to have never had any serious problems with the Outex kit, nor with the front rim. According to him, the Outex kit just recommends not dropping below 19psi for a rim that is NOT a safety rim. I'm planning on doing it after I burn through the stock tires.

 

Just my .02

 

Oh - WoodysWheels is an Outex dealer in the US, just as a PSA for anyone interested. (I'm not affiliated with either company - just a medic doing medic things)

Edited by med.jeeves
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REDHORSECA

I ordered the Outex kit FR21184 front and rear kit on eBay. YAMAHA TENERE 700 Spoke Wheel Tubeless Kit 21×1.85 and 18×4.00 MT / FR21184 OUTEX

 

I'm swapping out tires as soon as I bring my T7 home from the dealership, whenever that may be (now looks like OCT)?! I'll install the Outex kit during the tire swap.

 

I have a No-Mar tire changing machine and wheel balancer at home, so this should go fairly easy.

 

 

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Limey
5 hours ago, REDHORSECA said:

I ordered the Outex kit FR21184 front and rear kit on eBay. YAMAHA TENERE 700 Spoke Wheel Tubeless Kit 21×1.85 and 18×4.00 MT / FR21184 OUTEX

 

I'm swapping out tires as soon as I bring my T7 home from the dealership, whenever that may be (now looks like OCT)?! I'll install the Outex kit during the tire swap.

 

I have a No-Mar tire changing machine and wheel balancer at home, so this should go fairly easy.

 

 

I did the same thing about 6 weeks ago.

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loneranger700
20 hours ago, med.jeeves said:

For those concerned with the stock front tire conversion to Outex, theres a guy on youtube (Far&Further I think) who has 10,000KM with the OEM rims and Outex tubes. He did the same conversion to a CB500X that he put 100,000 KM on. He was so impressed by the Outex system he actually has a whole video on it, I think. This guy is not easy on his bikes (completely flips the CBX in one of his videos) and he claims to have never had any serious problems with the Outex kit, nor with the front rim. According to him, the Outex kit just recommends not dropping below 19psi for a rim that is NOT a safety rim. I'm planning on doing it after I burn through the stock tires.

 

Just my .02

 

Oh - WoodysWheels is an Outex dealer in the US, just as a PSA for anyone interested. (I'm not affiliated with either company - just a medic doing medic things)

Indeed it’s impressive! So impressive that we should ask for some updates on his tubeless system from the man himself!@FAR&FURTHER

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