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Tubeless Tyre Conversion


Motoadventure
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IMG_6363.thumb.jpg.9ef7061ce4e8e711194992db463b06e4.jpgFollowing a very bad experience with a front blow out on my GS 800 in the south of France last year and nearly ending up under a wagon I have decided to modify / convert the front wheel to tubeless with an insert. Done my Manchester Extreme before our trip to the Pyrenees it has now done 3500 miles on road / trail and is still going fine. They Just drilled the rim fixed the insert and inflate to 100 psi then put a tubeless tire on. You can then let the front down as low as you wish for trail and off road riding without the risk of snake bits to your tube.

I carried a tube repair kit and a plugging tool to cover all eventualities. ,

 

I am now awaiting one wide enough for the rear 150 rim if anyone knows if someone makes one? 

 

Thanks Mick            

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3 hours ago, Motoadventure said:

<snip>

 

I have decided to modify / convert the front wheel to tubeless with an insert. 

</snip>

when you say insert, you mean things like a Tubliss?

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2 hours ago, TimmyTheHog said:

when you say insert, you mean things like a Tubliss?

Yeah, looks like Tubliss to me. Mick to confirm!

 

Rich

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So you have to maintain 100PSI in the inner tube all the time while still running your normal tire psi? What happens when the tubliss system fails way out there somewhere?

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3 hours ago, shaneygrog said:

So you have to maintain 100PSI in the inner tube all the time while still running your normal tire psi? What happens when the tubliss system fails way out there somewhere?

The Tubliss system is just a giant rim lock inside a tubeless wheel. If it fails just put more air in the tire and fix it later.

That is assuming you have prepared the rim well. On my 650 I first prepared the rims as a tubeless rim with the Outex kit and THEN put in the Tubliss system. If I got a serious failure with the Tubliss system I could also remove it, fit another tubeless valve in the spare hole and run it as a normal tubeless wheel.

One issue with the Tubliss system is that it is designed for enduro bike rims of 1.6" front and 2.15" rear. I tested the system with 1.85" and 2.5" Excel rims and it still works flawlessly.

So Mick, if you fit a 2.5" Excel rim then the Tubliss kit will work fine.👍

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OK, it sounds a bit suss to me? If it needs 100psi to stop air leaking out where the spokes fit the rim, and the pressure is not there then it would sooner or later leak eh?

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Just now, shaneygrog said:

OK, it sounds a bit suss to me? If it needs 100psi to stop air leaking out where the spokes fit the rim, and the pressure is not there then it would sooner or later leak eh?

It doesn't need 100 PSI to to stop air leaking. It needs 100 PSI in the Tubliss system to keep the bead on the rim at very low tire pressures (0-12 PSI). Like I said it is just a rim lock (albeit the entire rim). On my bike I can let the Tubliss system down to zero, put 15+ PSI in the tire like normal and away I go.

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TL is definitely the way to go for the reasons mentioned, but my front Tubliss played up, then let me down in the desert last year. [Long version]

May have been unlucky (lumpy rim surface?), but was never a fan of it for my sort of riding.

 

On a travel bike the problem for me is:

a. the 100psi does drop and it will leak out the sides, but topping that up - 'every ride' as the sticker says - asks a lot of a mini compressor or crappy outback garage pumps. Check also your tyre gauge reads to 100 psi. (Mine does now).

b. most 21-inch rims don't have the TL lip to safety rn TL tyres, although rear rims (TT or TL) have had them for decades.

 

I'm getting a rare lipped 21" rim (Giant) made up by CWC down in Birmingham and then getting them to fit their vulcanised Airtight  spoke-sealing band (another £120). I used that last year on the Him too. No complaints.

 

But a wide rear rim is a lot easier to DIY.

With an Outex kit as mentioned, or much cheaper 3M 4411N tape, plus whatever glue you like on each nipple. 
I'm using Bostik 1782 + Goop - then either 3M or Puraflex mastic  - not decided yet (this is for an AT, not T7).

 

I admit, for very low pressures Tubliss has its place. It is primarily aimed at dirt bikes.

But up to a point, I find tyre tread can compensate for this

 

 

 

 

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10 hours ago, shaneygrog said:

So you have to maintain 100PSI in the inner tube all the time while still running your normal tire psi? What happens when the tubliss system fails way out there somewhere?

Remove and put the tube in and hopefully be OK.

 

Cheers Mick  

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4 hours ago, Motoadventure said:

Remove and put the tube in and hopefully be OK.

 

Cheers Mick  

So you carry tubes and tools with you then?

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9 hours ago, shaneygrog said:

So you carry tubes and tools with you then?

Yes, to cover all bases it’s best to be prepared I carry a front tube that can go in the back as well in an emergency.

 

cheers Mick 

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That's what I did on reaching the coast after a 5-hour ride at 25mph.

(Cheapo tube lasted 2 days but bought a spare in anticipation.)

One thing I discovered (after exhausting all possibilities of recovery) was the bulk of the collapsed Tubliss (a thick bicycle-sized inner tube inside a thick plastic sheath/casing) kept the Anakee Wild on the rim and that tyre didn't even get hot. Good to know.

 

I've never crashed from an inner-tube blow-out but know it could happen.

For me the day-to-day motivation is ease of puncture repairs: 2 mins spike and pump vs up to an hour struggling in the heat and blown sand trying not to pinch the tube.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

Good to hear I crashed my moped in 1979 with a blow out at 30 mph 😁 had a 130 KM front blow out in the South of France 2018 and nearly went under a wagon so hope the tubeless tire would be a bit slower going down. I also run Garmin dust caps linked to my Sat-Nav and helmet. these set an alarm off as soon as the tire gets to an adjustable minimum pressure . 

 

Sorry for the late reply Mick   

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