Jump to content
Yamaha Tenere 700 Forum

Watch out for diagonal ruts


Tom McDonough
 Share

Recommended Posts

Not sure how you avoid losing the front like this.  Maybe turn into the rut hitting it square.


 

 

4BAF6B99-3841-4253-8848-94828211C8FF.gif

2021 White T7, 2019 MT-7, 2021 CRF300 Rally, ‘14 V-Strom 1000 Adventure

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Suspension could have helped as it looks like it bottomed easily but either way it looks like the hole he hit was deep and square edged. If you dont wheelie over it, its tough to control what happens after you slam into it. 

 

I hope he's ok! 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

He looks to be on the husky side.  
I usually stand up when I get into rough stuff.

Broken collarbone I understand.

95F5E9A4-7216-4CEB-9ADC-B2DA1C29833A.jpeg

2021 White T7, 2019 MT-7, 2021 CRF300 Rally, ‘14 V-Strom 1000 Adventure

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Seems pretty simple to me. Combination of riding too fast and unable to read the road.

Yes a more skilled rider could have ridden it out, or if they saw it coming, jumped it.

4 hours ago, roy826 said:

Clutch and instant throttle to get the front end up and your across it. 

The narrator said something about the bike being new, and that he rode a WR.

Possibly he tried to do this but learned the hard way that clutch+throttle on a big twin does nothing but spin the wheel 😉

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Plenty of shadows on the track, making it difficult to read the potholes. I'm no hero, so I would have slowed down. Easy enough to run a commentary of riding techniques after viewing slo mo vision. Hopefully he's recovering well and learns from the mishap. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Too much speed compared to the driving skills. The reason for most accidents.

 

A wise man once said that don't ride faster than what your guardian angel can fly.

  • Like 2

"Eternally, unavoidably, eventually, all paths will lead to the cemetery." Sentenced

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Hogan said:

 

.......................Possibly he tried to do this but learned the hard way that clutch+throttle on a big twin does nothing but spin the wheel 😉

120090710_2497237543909003_3323532797335

The man Pol Tarrés hopping a locked gate on his 450-lb Yamaha Ténéré 700!

 

Talent will always overcome 😎

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Louis said:

Plenty of shadows on the track, making it difficult to read the potholes. I'm no hero, so I would have slowed down. Easy enough to run a commentary of riding techniques after viewing slo mo vision. Hopefully he's recovering well and learns from the mishap. 

I find it very hard to see indentions in shadows on a sunny day too.  He did not look like he was pushing it to me (watching the normal speed video).  Maybe more dampening would have helped a rider of his size.  As mentioned, standing allows using your body to help cushion off road riding.  The front may have glanced off a rock we can’t see in the shadow.  Probably more like a freak accident. . . which is very hard to avoid.  
Agreed, long wheelbase +450 lb bikes are not easy to wheelie in any gear but 1st . . . off road or otherwise.

2021 White T7, 2019 MT-7, 2021 CRF300 Rally, ‘14 V-Strom 1000 Adventure

Link to comment
Share on other sites

if he could have lofted the front wheel, he could have probably avoided it, or atleast lighten the front end so it didn't bite/slide so much. It looks like those are stock or stock ADV style tires? If so, that front tire is not the best selection for real off road and can slide and skip so easy. Of course, watching someone else crash and then dissecting it and then telling them how to do it right is, well is easy no? That can happen to any rider skill level on any bike with any tire combination. If you ride off road, eventually you will go down!

Edited by Firebolter
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Alan M said:
120090710_2497237543909003_3323532797335

The man Pol Tarrés hopping a locked gate on his 450-lb Yamaha Ténéré 700!

 

Talent will always overcome 😎

No doubt he has talent, but it sure helps to have a nice big kicker at the exact perfect distance from the obstacle to help clear it. And almost all of the really great and super talented guys (Torres, Jarvis, Knight, Birch and more and more) have a trials back round and that makes this kinda stuff way more doable for them on a bigger bike! 

 

Check out Chris Birch on a 1290 killing it

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

     “Damn things’ only got two wheels!”

Think about it.

     “ ‘bound to tip over once in a while.”

  Hope the rider heals up fast and right.

   Sometimes ride too fast; Like an old dog sticking his head out of the car window, it feels like I can fly.

 This guy was riding well till it went wrong. Be careful out there.

Edited by gone2seed
conserve a post
Link to comment
Share on other sites

For what it’s worth, I’ve been flung or nearly flung on numerous occasions, riding off road on my 100kg enduro bike hitting unseen half buried rocks. Odds stack up when you double the bike weight.

 

As others have said, it’s easy to say what you could have done watching a video but the truth is if you’re just riding and not competing your just not expecting this and it’s probably luck if you stay upright or not.

 

The Tarres vid was tongue in cheek by the way.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Moderators

Bummer, but could happen to anybody, BTDT.  My guess during his rehab he'll be shopping for something along these lines.

 

$_57.JPG?set_id=880000500F

  • Like 2

 

"Men do not quit playing because they grow old, they grow old because they quit playing" Oliver Wendell Holmes - Mods - HDB handguards, Camel-ADV Gut guard, 1 finger clutch, The Fix pedal & Rally pipe, RR side/tail rack, RR 90nm spring & Headlight guard, Rally seat, OEM heated grips- stablemate Beta 520RS

Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 minutes ago, AZJW said:

Bummer, but could happen to anybody, BTDT.  My guess during his rehab he'll be shopping for something along these lines.

 

$_57.JPG?set_id=880000500F

In the video there's a note that the rider always wears fully protective gear, but chose not to on this particular day due to high temps and what was going to be an easy trail. I can relate.

 

Recently, I've been getting casual about wearing my full protective gear on "easy" rides. I have a variety of justifications, the most lame being that I don't want to scratch up my new T7 with my abrasive kevlar Motoport pants - the same pants that saved my skin countless times! Just a few days ago I was riding 50mph + on dirt roads similar to the one in the video without all of my protective gear. This could have been a video about me. I've let my guard down and I've gotten complacent. Time to put my big boy (moto) pants back on and get some scratches on the bike.

 

This video was a good kick in the pants for me. Thank you to the original poster.

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 hours ago, DT675 said:

Suspension could have helped as it looks like it bottomed easily but either way it looks like the hole he hit was deep and square edged. If you dont wheelie over it, its tough to control what happens after you slam into it. 

 

I hope he's ok! 

It was a new bike running the stock tires and presumably stock suspension. At 16:00 of the video it says he ended up with a dislocated collarbone, punctured lung, torn ligaments and 10 fractures of six different ribs.

Ouch. I genuinely hope he's on the way to a full recovery.

I fractured several ribs and punctured a lung in a moderate speed (armourless) mtn bike crash a few years ago. It's not fun, and the months-long recovery continues to be an effective reminder to always go ATGATT on my moto's!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Desert Mariner said:

In the video there's a note that the rider always wears fully protective gear, but chose not to on this particular day due to high temps and what was going to be an easy trail. I can relate.

 

Recently, I've been getting casual about wearing my full protective gear on "easy" rides. I have a variety of justifications, the most lame being that I don't want to scratch up my new T7 with my abrasive kevlar Motoport pants - the same pants that saved my skin countless times! Just a few days ago I was riding 50mph + on dirt roads similar to the one in the video without all of my protective gear. This could have been a video about me. I've let my guard down and I've gotten complacent. Time to put my big boy (moto) pants back on and get some scratches on the bike.

 

This video was a good kick in the pants for me. Thank you to the original poster.

 

When riding in hot weather, being well hydrated is better than all the protective gear you can wear. I offer no judgemnt of the dude who fell off. I tend to fall of at traffic lights so can't really comment.

 

However, lots of protective gear add to a loss of water from the body which is really hard to replace along with the electrolytes. I'd be more inclined to go really slow to avoid big sweats, hard manovers etc. When travelling the edge of the Sahara in hot sun I reconed to pick up a bike in the sand needed half a litre of water. It worked well to avoid a pick up!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm a HUGE fan of MVDBR Enduro -  many of the improvements Josh has made to his T7 have inspired me to do similar.

He rides it hard, the way it should be ridden.

Sorry his pal crashed

MOST importantly - we need more info on the paramedic  🙂  MEOW!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We always wore chest protection on our thumpers . . . saved my ribs on many occasions.  

I mainly wore it due to my buddies grabbing a handful of clutch to launch rocks at each other.

 

I now ride by myself a lot . . . no roost protection needed.  I have hit rocks that I never saw . . . I tend to ride as far back on the seat as I can . . . to keep the front light.  
 

Riding big adventure bikes like a dual sport definitely requires more precaution.  

 

 

 

 

Edited by Tom McDonough
  • Like 1

2021 White T7, 2019 MT-7, 2021 CRF300 Rally, ‘14 V-Strom 1000 Adventure

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That is painful to watch. I haven't done that on a motorcycle, but I did it on a mountain bike hitting a loose rock that rolled. Broke my shoulder. During healing, my cartilage disappeared and now I have a titanium-plastic shoulder joint. Extra strong (I think). Don't we put titanium parts on our bikes to improve them?! Now I can ride even harder ... just as long as I don't do what this guy did. Ever. 🙂

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Desert Mariner said:

In the video there's a note that the rider always wears fully protective gear, but chose not to on this particular day due to high temps and what was going to be an easy trail. I can relate.

 

Recently, I've been getting casual about wearing my full protective gear on "easy" rides. I have a variety of justifications, the most lame being that I don't want to scratch up my new T7 with my abrasive kevlar Motoport pants - the same pants that saved my skin countless times! Just a few days ago I was riding 50mph + on dirt roads similar to the one in the video without all of my protective gear. This could have been a video about me. I've let my guard down and I've gotten complacent. Time to put my big boy (moto) pants back on and get some scratches on the bike.

 

This video was a good kick in the pants for me. Thank you to the original poster.

 

I do ATGATT to the best that I can do and have studied many people and their recommendations.

Boots, Leather pants (w knee protection),  hip armor,  and for the upper the black Fox vest (w back and front removed),  Tek vest (directed to rib coverage), a high viz jacket and finally a HELITE Turtle airbag vest (has a back protector built in). I'd rather sweat than bleed as they say. Up to about 80 is about max then I need to tailor to more heat. I follow a YouTuber and he hit the same type of rut and broke his collar bone and swears he'll never ride without the Airbag vest. Neither will I. The cost is indisputable.

 

 

Edited by ADVUSA
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm so tightly wrapped in cotton wool that I'm frightened to get it dirty! 😁 I  ride within my capabilities and age related issues. The T7 is NOT  a MX bike. So ride it within its limits. If you're riding hard  wear the right protective gear. Sooner or later we all have our regretted moments. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, dobbi said:

When riding in hot weather, being well hydrated is better than all the protective gear you can wear. I offer no judgemnt of the dude who fell off. I tend to fall of at traffic lights so can't really comment.

 

However, lots of protective gear add to a loss of water from the body which is really hard to replace along with the electrolytes. I'd be more inclined to go really slow to avoid big sweats, hard manovers etc. When travelling the edge of the Sahara in hot sun I reconed to pick up a bike in the sand needed half a litre of water. It worked well to avoid a pick up!

dobbi

 

It sounds like you have some serious experience in hot weather. Your thoughts on riding slower & avoiding hard maneuvers makes a lot of sense.

 

I've usually chosen to wear all of my gear here in the desert southwest USA and Mexico even on the hottest days. I agree with you that the concern about water loss is very real.

 

My day job is teaching wilderness/remote medicine to outdoor enthusiasts and training first responders and emergency medical technicians. In hot environments, we can often hydrate ourselves adequately if we've brought along enough water and moderate our behavior as you've suggested. The real threat is heat stroke. With all of our protective gear, we run the risk of dangerously overheating especially if the environment is hot and humid. I use kevlar mesh protective gear and a cooling vest. Since I ride on the road as much as I ride off road, I'm concerned about a high speed, sliding fall. I get the abrasion protection of leathers and I can manage my heat a bit better.

 

In REMOTE and hot environments, the danger of over heating is compounded with a crash that leaves you injured and unable to care for yourself - unable to move to shade and perhaps unable to ride out. The fellow who crashed was fortunate to have crashed on a road with EMS services available. I would wager that many of us ride in remote environments where help is delayed or perhaps even non-existent. Full protective gear can reduce the chances we'll be sitting in the desert far from help, slowly dying from exposure to the heat and running out of water.

 

Part of adventure riding is an entire constellation of decisions and precautions, including planning and preparing for emergencies, carrying adequate supplies, getting advanced training in first aid, carrying communication devices on our person, riding slower and carefully assessing the consequences of an accident.

 

I say all of the above with full knowledge of my admission that I've recently become lax with wearing my protective gear. I'm far from perfect and I should know better. The video was a good wake-up call for me. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Happened to me in the summer riding the TCAT , 3rd gear and had no warning and got tossed into the rail on the bridge, 4 broken rids, punctured lung and partially collapsed and torn bicep muscle and tendon. It’s easy to say you should do this and that but it happened so bloody fast.

9C7061F7-5B82-4A68-857F-896354406978.jpeg

D79C853F-6C0E-4864-8BD0-164A161E2751.jpeg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

Our Friends

Tenere across the USA

Tenere 700 Forum. We are just Tenere 700 owners and fans

Tenere700.net is not affiliated with Yamaha Motor Co and any opinions expressed on this website are solely those of ea individual author and do not represent Yamaha Motor Co or Tenere700.net .

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.