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DT675

Changing a tire tube on the road

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DT675

So I’m not new to motorcycles by no means but I am new to long distance/ adventure riding.  One thing I want to be able to do is change a tube on the trail. I’ve been thinking about this for awhile now. I’m going to get a motion pro bead breaker/ tire spoons.  They have super long steel ones for home use and short aluminum ones for on the trail.
 

The thing I’m worried about with the aluminum ones is- are they long enough to do the job? Strong enough? Has anyone actually used them on the trail? Does the bead breaker part even work? I’d love to get the shorter and lighter ones but if they make the job near impossible then it doesn’t matter. 
 

Last thing, I don’t know about you but any time I have changed a motorcycle tire at home I’ve had to use something to lube the rim to either get the tire to slide over and/ or seat the bead. How is this done on the trail? What are you bringing with to assist with this?  
 

Thanks for any suggestions! 


2013 Triumph Street Triple - 2013 Triumph Daytona track bike - 2017 Honda CRF250L 

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OnHellas

The shorter Motion Pro Bead Breaker works well. I usually find that I have to work my way around the tyre a bit.

Starting with a little “nibble” and gradually building up to bigger bites.

They do work, are very strong in my experience and I wouldn’t travel without them.

 

As for some kind of lube to get the tyre seated back on the rim ..... shower gel from my washkit worked last time, it’s all I had. 
The time before I was near a shop so bought some washing up liquid.

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MotoCP

I recently bought the MP short aluminum bead breakers and they’ve been fine to brake the bead (with patience) and remove/replace tyres (Stiff walled Mitas E09’s)

 

They are super light and compact so easily fit in my Kriega Tall pack with a small tin of WD40 (The lubricant of choice as recommended by Lyndon Poskitt)


https://youtu.be/r7mBa7-5OIg

 

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Chris Mann

I love the Motion Pro tool range , some really useful kit. I’ve a set of the bead breakers zip tied under the seat on my KTM950, but not found an easy space on the T7 to stow them. But I have bought a set of very light compact bead breaker, levers, axle spanner’s from Eastbound.com..A lot easier to pack, light,nicely made and he does a kit specifically for our T7. Not had a puncture in the field yet to try them out but they feel quality ..Check out the web site and get sweaty palms 😁

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Moto

Just changed out my stock Pirellis. The front was no problem, but the rear was a bear to get off! Being a radial, it is so freaking stiff. I don't think I'd be able to fix a flat with that tire on a trail. I put on a non-radial knobby (Motoz), and it was much easier to install. I did need a lubricant and compressor to get it seated on the rim, though. I think I could manage this one for a field repair, but getting it seated on the rim after might not be possible with a kit pump. Could at least limp out to an air station somewhere. I need to check out the bead-breaking tools mentioned on this thread. I used a big C-clamp in my garage, but it wasn't easy.

20201224_142552.jpg

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DT675

Good point on the compressor. I’ll have to think about seating the bead a little more....


2013 Triumph Street Triple - 2013 Triumph Daytona track bike - 2017 Honda CRF250L 

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DT675

I’ve seen WD-40 mentioned here on the forum and else where.  Sounds like a good packing idea.  

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2013 Triumph Street Triple - 2013 Triumph Daytona track bike - 2017 Honda CRF250L 

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TimmyTheHog

i know this thread is about a TUBE TIRE

 

However, for a TUBELSS TIRE, a positive on tire lubing with WD40 is you can use the trick of setting fire to seat the bead.

 

Not sure if works with tube....I would doubt it tho...

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LEViDO
On 12/28/2020 at 6:08 AM, DT675 said:

So I’m not new to motorcycles by no means but I am new to long distance/ adventure riding.  One thing I want to be able to do is change a tube on the trail. I’ve been thinking about this for awhile now. I’m going to get a motion pro bead breaker/ tire spoons.  They have super long steel ones for home use and short aluminum ones for on the trail.
 

The thing I’m worried about with the aluminum ones is- are they long enough to do the job? Strong enough? Has anyone actually used them on the trail? Does the bead breaker part even work? I’d love to get the shorter and lighter ones but if they make the job near impossible then it doesn’t matter. 
 

Last thing, I don’t know about you but any time I have changed a motorcycle tire at home I’ve had to use something to lube the rim to either get the tire to slide over and/ or seat the bead. How is this done on the trail? What are you bringing with to assist with this?  
 

Thanks for any suggestions! 


OKO XT is a breakthrough tyre sealant for enduro, motocross, dirt and trial motorbikes. Who needs mousse? Also great for mopeds with tubes.

 

 

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AZJW

Interesting stuff, I might give it a go.  Review was performed on a Tenere` 660, so it must be compatible with the T7. 😉

 

Bike-Seal-Review-33.jpg

If there's one thing that's guaranteed to ruin a ride on the bike, it's got to be a puncture. From a rogue screw on the road or a thorn out on the trails, it's bad news. So we decided to test Bike Seal, a clever product originally developed by NASA that actively prevents...

US distributor.   

 


"Men do not quit playing because they grow old, they grow old because they quit playing" Oliver Wendell Holmes

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JamesE

It's easy enough to do. I had a puncture on the Welsh TET earlier this year, had the rear off and the tube changed using the motion pro tyre levers. Used shower gel to lube up the rim (or just some soap in a small bottle in your tool kit will do). And we had a small compressor to re-inflate. 

Pro-Tip, don't lay the bike down on a bank like we did here! Spent more time getting the bike going again than changing the tyre. Laying it down floods the engine. If anyone is interested, the fix ended up being to take out the fueling fuse, turn the engine over to burn all of the fuel out, then put the fuse back in. Talk about a nightmare afternoon, but we all learn from our mistakes.

20200926_124333 (1).jpg

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9to5adv.com

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Alan M
On 12/28/2020 at 11:43 AM, Chris Mann said:

I love the Motion Pro tool range , some really useful kit. I’ve a set of the bead breakers zip tied under the seat on my KTM950, but not found an easy space on the T7 to stow them. But I have bought a set of very light compact bead breaker, levers, axle spanner’s from Eastbound.com..A lot easier to pack, light,nicely made and he does a kit specifically for our T7. Not had a puncture in the field yet to try them out but they feel quality ..Check out the web site and get sweaty palms 😁

I have the alloy MP breaker/levers and they fit sideways behind the battery ok.

 

I had a look at the tools on Eastbound website and they do look good, I'm pretty much sorted with levers and wheel tools but I'd definitely consider them if I needed tools.

 

One thing I did read on their website which seemed really good advice was preparation before a long trip. That was to break the tyre beads and re-lube before the trip, will make removal that much easier if you're unfortunate to get a puncture.

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Alan M
8 minutes ago, JamesE said:

It's easy enough to do. I had a puncture on the Welsh TET earlier this year, had the rear off and the tube changed using the motion pro tyre levers. Used shower gel to lube up the rim (or just some soap in a small bottle in your tool kit will do). And we had a small compressor to re-inflate. 

Pro-Tip, don't lay the bike down on a bank like we did here! Spent more time getting the bike going again than changing the tyre. Laying it down floods the engine. If anyone is interested, the fix ended up being to take out the fueling fuse, turn the engine over to burn all of the fuel out, then put the fuse back in. Talk about a nightmare afternoon, but we all learn from our mistakes.

20200926_124333 (1).jpg

The flooding seems weird, the engine is fuel injected so fuel can't get past the injectors without them firing.

 

With our 4T and TPi enduro bikes they get left on their sides all the time with no issues, carb bikes can be a different matter.

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JamesE
1 minute ago, Alan M said:

The flooding seems weird, the engine is fuel injected so fuel can't get past the injectors without them firing.

 

With our 4T and TPi enduro bikes they get left on their sides all the time with no issues, carb bikes can be a different matter.

That's what we thought, but there was definitely fuel somewhere that needed burning out 🤷‍♂️


9to5adv.com

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Johnnyboxer
1 hour ago, JamesE said:

It's easy enough to do. I had a puncture on the Welsh TET earlier this year, had the rear off and the tube changed using the motion pro tyre levers. Used shower gel to lube up the rim (or just some soap in a small bottle in your tool kit will do). And we had a small compressor to re-inflate. 

Pro-Tip, don't lay the bike down on a bank like we did here! Spent more time getting the bike going again than changing the tyre. Laying it down floods the engine. If anyone is interested, the fix ended up being to take out the fueling fuse, turn the engine over to burn all of the fuel out, then put the fuse back in. Talk about a nightmare afternoon, but we all learn from our mistakes.

20200926_124333 (1).jpg

Centre stand would have helped 😂

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Ktmmitch

For hardcore off road, with extended road work, I use a bib mousse in a tubeless rim, then inflate the tyre for the longer road section, let out all the air when doing trails, then re-inflate for the road ride home, I think it's the best of both worlds

79C0A367-8D93-45E6-8146-D6D195C46825.jpeg

Edited by Ktmmitch
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Alan M
59 minutes ago, Ktmmitch said:

For hardcore off road, with extended road work, I use a bib mousse in a tubeless rim, then inflate the tyre for the longer road section, let out all the air when doing trails, then re-inflate for the road ride home, I think it's the best of both worlds

79C0A367-8D93-45E6-8146-D6D195C46825.jpeg

Sounds good for short trips, not sure I'd fancy a mousse filled tyre for long high speed road miles.

 

Do you run a rim lock?

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NvNick

Is there a tip over switch ? That would have kept it from running and reset when you pulled and replaced the fuse. 

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WalterT

There is a tip over switch, but this is reset by switching the ignition off an on again. No need to pull fuses, that would be really annoying on the trail :-).

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Rich TT
1 hour ago, WalterT said:

There is a tip over switch, but this is reset by switching the ignition off an on again. No need to pull fuses, that would be really annoying on the trail :-).

Agreed. Mine tipped over off road as I lost my balance in lopsided ruts. Wouldn't start at all. Switch the key off, back on again and started straight away.

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Ktmmitch
16 hours ago, Alan M said:

Sounds good for short trips, not sure I'd fancy a mousse filled tyre for long high speed road miles.

 

Do you run a rim lock?

No rim lock, it doesn't matter if the tyre slips a bit with a mousse, I did over 1,500 miles no problem with this set up

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Alpenschrauber
On 12/31/2020 at 4:42 PM, Alan M said:

The flooding seems weird, the engine is fuel injected so fuel can't get past the injectors without them firing.

 

With our 4T and TPi enduro bikes they get left on their sides all the time with no issues, carb bikes can be a different matter.

 

On 12/31/2020 at 4:29 PM, JamesE said:

It's easy enough to do. I had a puncture on the Welsh TET earlier this year, had the rear off and the tube changed using the motion pro tyre levers. Used shower gel to lube up the rim (or just some soap in a small bottle in your tool kit will do). And we had a small compressor to re-inflate. 

Pro-Tip, don't lay the bike down on a bank like we did here! Spent more time getting the bike going again than changing the tyre. Laying it down floods the engine. If anyone is interested, the fix ended up being to take out the fueling fuse, turn the engine over to burn all of the fuel out, then put the fuse back in. Talk about a nightmare afternoon, but we all learn from our mistakes.

20200926_124333 (1).jpg

Hi, I do not want to highjack the thread, but I make my mind up regarding the flooding of the cylinders: What about the gas running through the tank ventilation, the canister, (purge) hoses and the throttle bodies into the combustion chambers?  Maybe a stuck rollover valve or an angle that is too much upright for the valve to close. I just do not see any other path for the gas running into the motor 

Happy New Year from Switzerland,

Olli 

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Alan M
34 minutes ago, Alpenschrauber said:

 

Hi, I do not want to highjack the thread, but I make my mind up regarding the flooding of the cylinders: What about the gas running through the tank ventilation, the canister, (purge) hoses and the throttle bodies into the combustion chambers?  Maybe a stuck rollover valve or an angle that is too much upright for the valve to close. I just do not see any other path for the gas running into the motor 

Happy New Year from Switzerland,

Olli 

That's a very good point with the canister vent, must be top of the list of possible suspects 👍

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A A Ron

Here is my system:

  • Motion Pro 27mm combo lever for rear axle (and tires).  I've filed down the ridge on one side so that it engages the somewhat recessed rear axle nut better.
  • Motion Pro 27mm to 3/8" drive adapter with 3/8" axle hex tool (not shown) for front axle (19mm)
  • Two Motion Pro short levers with the curved tip at one end that you can hook on the lip of the rim to help reduce the chance of pinching a tube (3 levers total)
  • Spare standard duty front AND rear natural rubber tubes because:
    • For dirt bikes with smaller rear tires, I've always  used a 21" front tube for a temporary on an 18" rear.  That likely won't work for the much larger 150/70-18 rear on the T7.
    • UHD and HD tubes can be difficult to patch, and they are really for avoiding pinch flats vs. punctures.  I won't be running the T7 at dirt bike tire pressures where pinch flats are somewhat common.
    • Natural rubber accepts a patch better than butyl rubber
  • Lots of rubber cement and patches
  • I've never had trouble breaking the bead on tubed rims on the trail or in the garage.  I can usually just jump on a stubborn bead to break it.  Thus, no bead breaker.  Maybe the stock Pirelli radial rear is more difficult to break off the rim.  I'll take the advice above and break and re-lube rims in the garage.
  • Multi-purpose camping soap for tire lube, or whatever is handy.
  • Bicycle hand pump.  Lots of work, but it is light and compact compared to a compressor.   Maybe some CO2 cartridges too.
  • Valve core removal tool, or valve cap that doubles for that purpose.

 

 

 

20210101_094755.jpg

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Brent

That looks good, you will need a different tool to remove the front tire.  I just took a bolt  that fits into the axel then welded a nut on to it,   Also, the tire on the rear will need a bead breaker.  For some reason they are really tough to break the bead.

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