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What RPM when shifting?


JasonD

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At what RPM do you shift up? I, unfortunately, only have about 2100km on my T7¬†and use it to commute back and forth from work never getting above 50-60km/hr and never needing to go higher than 4th. Yes, I know, it's a shame but work and my Husky FX 350 are to blame ūüôā¬†

 

I notice some videos out there of people shifting way up in the 9000-10 000RPM range. I find myself shifting at 4000-5000RPM? Shifting is smooth...

 

Is shifting at that high of RPMs a waste of fuel and unnecessary wear on the engine or is my 'never getting it high in the RPMs' bogging the engine down and building up carbon etc?? Do others shift at low RPMs when 'cruising' around and only shift at higher RPMs when on dirt roads or opening up on the highways?

 

Thoughts?

 

 

 

 

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You are fine at 4k-5k....

Obviously you are new to motorcycling, we all were there once.

With time comes wisdom... just keep riding!

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We are all tattooed in our cradles with the beliefs of our tribe

~Oliver Wendell Holmes~

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I shift between 4 and 5 thousand as well.  Normally.  I use higher rpm when I open her up on the pavement.  And really high RPMs off road when going up hill in first, second or third gear.  

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4-5, but at 10,000 miles I've noticed she likes it when I shift around 6k now. It's much smoother into the higher gears.

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Hibob: Yes, new! Only a year in and def need more riding/wisdom on the T7. Most of my seat time is on the Husky atm

 

BMRT7: This is the whole point of this post. It's a T7 and not a crotch rocket. I've never felt the 'need' to rev any higher? It just feels great. Obviously, off-road may differ, but on the paved roads I can't ever see the 'need' to rev so high which is why I was wondering if it is necessary to be able to do so. To me, it's like owning a sports car that can do 250km/hr / 155miles/hr but never getting near that speed; ever! Will constantly shifting in the 4-6RMP range cause long term damage/bogging/fouling plugs/carbon build up etc...?

 

Landshark: Thanks! That's what I was thinking and hoping for...

 

Loneranger700: Good to know!! I'll adjust and try to shift at higher RPMs once I get more kms/miles on her...

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I am an old fart,

Generally shift here, but if in a hurry shift there.

This bike can be run in a range in any of 3 gears.

It saves on shifting… did I mention I’m Lazy. Driving through Moravia ,30 to 20 mph, ran it in 4th.

Leave a stop in 2nd,even 3rd. Yea , Can do it. 

 

Edited by gone2seed
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I think I usually shift in the 4-5k rpm range too when I'm taking it easy.   Lower revs will not cause any long term damage.   The only 'need' for higher revs is to accelerate faster.    Not that anybody cares, or that it will make much difference,  but it's more efficient (better mpg) to keep the revs lower. 

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A healthy happy engine experiences a wide range of operational revs. (Even on break in) Though unless you’ve gone full exhaust & ECU flash, the power curve droops significantly north of 9k. 
   This engine with the T7 gearing seems content to work in such a wide range.

It tractors forgivingly away from lazy downshifting & doesn’t mind if you wring it out to the limit either.

 

   First is reserved for the technical/steep stuff, as second pulls away from the lights too easily. The power feels great to me up to about 9k, but more conservative riding sees most shifts happening before 7k & if I really want to sip fuel it will happily operate below 5 all day long.

 

  Give yourself some space & wind it up once & a while, it will surprise & thank you!

Edited by Hammerhead
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I usually ride to maximize MPG so I shift around 4-5k but on a recent trip i was trying to burn up a rear tire so I could swap it out.  I was riding winding mountain roads for about 155 miles and remembered a review where the poster stated the bike was a hoot above 6k.  

 

SO I left it in 3rd and activated hooligan mode for about 20 miles bouncing between 6k and 9-10k between the corners.  I also realized that due to my frugal right wrist, I had only previously been using about 70% of full throttle.  The bike is so torquey you don't really need full throttle.  But in 3rd above 6k wrung out I was discovering a whole new side of my lovely lady.  What a fn blast. She pulls very nicely in 3rd from 6k on up easily hitting 70-80 between corners. I didn't manage to waste as much of my rear tire as I wanted but I sure did scallop the hell out of the front slowing down.  The 104F temps didn't help either.

 

J

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Lol. Yup she’s lively up there. 
 

I used to have a Honda Cb500x. I actually bought it mostly for its fuel mileage. It could crazy good mileage. But such a boring heavy and poorly suspended bike.. Now with the T7 I REFUSE for mileage to be a factor. RIP. EVERY. CORNER!

 

If I get shet for mileage.. I‚Äôll bring more fuel with. ūüėܬ†

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