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Rocky terrain? Comfort level?


NeilW

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I saw this short video - it is actually an ad but really shows rocky terrain riding. 
I wouldn’t want to ride in this all day long but I do feel comfortable in this type of terrain. I would consider myself an “amateur expert” on 265 pound dirt bikes and that experience carries to 500# as an intermediate “scared e cat”. Would you ride this for a mile ?


A cool little rocky canyon, somewhere in Nevada, on my 890 with the new Reckless 80 v4.0 luggage system. Oh and the new...

 

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Lot of my local trails are that kinda way. Tbh I'd much rather ride that for a mile than a mile of mud.

 

Only odd loose stones so not difficult in my eyes 

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@NeilW I think comfort levels are largley determined by what you're used to riding. AZ is a rock depository for the lower 48 so yeah, I'd probably ride that on my T7.  The few times I've ridden in mud sucked, with the last time culminating in tearing my MCL, so not comfortable in mud. Regarding rock gardens, if it was a known tough section, I'd chose to ride my 250 lb Beta. 

I've  "stumbled" across sections like that on my T7, navigated them mostly without incident and felt better about my abilities as the result. Next time around though, if possible,  I plan ahead and take the little bike. Being on the backside of 60 supposedly makes one wiser, but for me, the jury is still out. 

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Just now, AZJW said:

@NeilW I think comfort levels are largley determined by what you're used to riding. AZ is a rock depository for the lower 48 so yeah, I'd probably ride that on my T7.  The few times I've ridden in mud sucked, with the last time culminating in tearing my MCL, so not comfortable in mud. Regarding rock gardens, if it was a known tough section, I'd chose to ride my 250 lb Beta. 

I've  "stumbled" across sections like that on my T7, navigated them mostly without incident and felt better about my abilities as the result. Next time around though, if possible,  I plan ahead and take the little bike. Being on the backside of 60 supposedly makes one wiser, but for me, the jury is still out. 

This is exactly it. I think of the major technical terrains as mud, rocks, and sand. It's often hard to get experience beyond what's immediately around us because you generally have to wander pretty far to see something new, and that winds up being just on long rides where we pass through an area. It takes a while to get used to get accustomed to new terrain, so you just wind up muddling your way through it as locals cruise or blast by you. But they have the luxury of being immersed in it, and chances are if they're in your neck of the woods, the roles would be reversed.

 

I think rocks are fun, but they can be painful and destructive. Sand requires the most zenning, but at least it's a bit plusher when you crash. Not sure what the upside to mud is.

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1 hour ago, random1781 said:

This is exactly it. I think of the major technical terrains as mud, rocks, and sand. It's often hard to get experience beyond what's immediately around us because you generally have to wander pretty far to see something new, and that winds up being just on long rides where we pass through an area. It takes a while to get used to get accustomed to new terrain, so you just wind up muddling your way through it as locals cruise or blast by you. But they have the luxury of being immersed in it, and chances are if they're in your neck of the woods, the roles would be reversed.

 

I think rocks are fun, but they can be painful and destructive. Sand requires the most zenning, but at least it's a bit plusher when you crash. Not sure what the upside to mud is.

There is no upside to mud. A buddy and I took what looked like a short cut in Idaho last September and it quickly turned to mud. It packed both our front tires and he went down three times just with us backing out of there. I didn’t go down at all but I was much more subdued on the handlebar inputs.  That’s my 8000 miles of dirt, sand, rocks and mud experience in SoCal. 

Edited by NeilW
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Mud is way better than sand!

Nice and soft and squishy 🥰

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Mud sucks - literally.

But I'm getting along with it if need be and it isn't axle-deep (once had this experience, no thanks).

 

One tip to get through it on big bikes: The so-called poop chair position (my riding coach named it this way). More of a squat than actual standing, knees out (!), elbows out, butt low. The bike can move freely beneath you, especially sideways, and pick its line. Works at low speeds and does only work on big bikes with enough weight on the front wheel. Avoid photographers.

 

Zero experience in sand, but think it won't be easier than mud.

Regarding rocky terrain, I'd love to give it a try. Imagine loose babyhead is probably the meanest of all, wouldn't start with this stuff 😳

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5 hours ago, Tenerider said:

Mud sucks - literally.

 Avoid photographers.

 

 

Best advice so far in this thread. 😀

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"Men do not quit playing because they grow old, they grow old because they quit playing" Oliver Wendell Holmes - Mods - HDB handguards, Camel-ADV Gut guard, 1 finger clutch, The Fix pedal & Rally pipe, RR side/tail rack, RR 90nm spring & Headlight guard, Rally seat, OEM heated grips- stablemate Beta 520RS

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12 minutes ago, AZJW said:

Mud sucks - literally.

 Avoid photographers.

I used to ride enduros back in the day. You learned quickly that whenever you saw people with cameras -Be Careful-

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Around  my area rocky terrain (we don't have much of it) has a mix of mud, water and leaves which as you can tell where I am going with this makes a perfect recipe for supper slippery. I am not a fan of mud ether because its ether clay with truck or quad ruts or muskeg.  The worse with sand is steering. A little mud in the right condition can be fun but can become not fun very quickly especially when you loose the front end  in it.     

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13 hours ago, S.Ga.Rider said:

That's really not that bad. A mile would be a piece of cake. 

 

Yeah, down in Australia we do stuff like that on the back wheel.

 

 

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2 minutes ago, Hollybrook said:

The upside to mud is that it's hard to recognize you in the crash photos. 

And there'll no doubt you're a badass - if you stay away from pressure washers, your bike will wear its coat(ing) with pride for weeks, a sign of your adventurous spirit.

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Mud packs the tire tread, sand does not.  I'll take sand.  Maybe I just need to go faster to keep the tread clean...

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Here in the PNW, we can find almost any terrapin, sand being the most rare. Loose baby head mine fields can be treacherous, & roots, especially those wet, greasy ones, will teach you real fast to get squared away as possible & keep the front end light. Even the small ones can serve up some serious humble pie if you’re wet season game is rusty.

Edited by Hammerhead
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