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Tenerider's T7


Tenerider

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Disclaimer: Hope I don't annoy too many of you guys by asking those stupid newbie questions all over again...seriously, I tried to get as much info by myself first 😕

If need be, please move this thread to another section @Cruizin - not totally sure if this should be in the build & maintenance logs, as it's not really a build yet.

 

So, this is going to be tough for me. Being notoriously overcautious while knowing that light is right brings me sleepless nights already - and I don't even have my T7 yet.

Although I really like the Tenere's OEM look, I think I will have to add several items for protecting it and increasing its reliability offroad.

I just hope it won't look too bulky.

 

Here is what I'm planning to modify on the bike, more or less in this order:

 

Step 0 (fitted by dealer):

- HP Corse SP-1 high exhaust - I like its look on the bike, but more than that it really seems to make sense in terms of protecting the exhaust when dropping the bike. I hope that it won't be too loud (as you might know, we already have some bikes banned on several roads here in Europe, at least in Austria).

- tail tidy (exhaust requires it), LED indicators (not sure which ones)

 

Step 1 (quite soon after getting the bike):

- Barkbusters or Acerbis Handguards (steel, not aluminum)

- Axle sliders

- Crash bars (totally unsure about these: only lower, like SW-Motech/Touratech/Hepco&Becker,or  only upper like Hepco&Becker Rally/Adventure Spec? For my taste, less is more, but I don't want my dream machine to be scratched too soon)

 

Step 2:

- Skid (of course) - I narrowed my choice down to Camel ADV, AXP and AltRider, since I "need" linkage protection (actually, I am quite sure I'll never need it, but it feels better). Euro5 compatibility might be a problem with AltRider.

- maybe some engine case guards (depending on the crash bars and skid - I really don't know if these make any sense)

- Camel ADV finger clutch kit (perhaps, depends on how I get along with the clutch)

- Anti-wobble solution (not sure which one yet)

 

 

Step 3:

- Rally seat - I'm not too tall at 187cm, but have quite long legs, so the additional height should really be no problem. This depends on how I get along with the OEM seat.

- AS side luggage racks - not only do these look quite nice, they should also give some protection for the rear. Kriega OS Base would be another option for travelling, not sure yet.

- Radiator guard - will go down the DIY route, as shown here:

- Camel ADV fork guards (maybe)

 

Since I am a total beginner, I expect to be riding on tarmac first for most of the time, getting a feeling for my "desert queen" first. So, protecting it from scratches is my main object with the first mods - later on, I really want to go off road and do longer trips. That's when skid and so on come into play.

 

Any comments or ideas are highly welcome!

 

Jan

 

 

 

 

Edited by Tenerider
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@DuncMan thanks so much mate - that's what I hoped for, advise from an experienced rider!

 

Sounds all very good to me. The AltRider skid is definitely one of my favourites, will need to check back with them when the Euro5 model will be available.

Will check all the other mods.

 

Being a (now former) audax cyclist/randonneur, sitting on planks for longer time is usually a no-brainer for me. OK, once I couldn't feel my third leg for about three days afterwards, but my butt was fine. Anyway, not recommended 😉 And a motorcycle is a different kind of bike than a bicycle.

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2 minutes ago, DuncMan said:

 

Then you must come and do the Isle of Wight randonneur! It's only 67 miles so easier than most, too.  😄

OK, just put it on my bucket list!

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By the way, regarding the AS crash bars: I think a bending crash bar is by far better than a brutally rigid one, which will only transform maximum force to the framerails. I'd rather sacrifice my crash bars than my bike's frame.

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I'd hang back, join forums (tick), Facebook groups etc and then read.

 

I bought Acerbis,changed to BarkBusters, sold Acerbis, lost money. I had the OEM skid plate fitted, now want to change, will lose money. Repeat for crash bars, navigation brackets, luggage racks, etc, etc, etc, etc.

 

Take your time. If you drop it on road, I don't think I'd bother going off road 😆

Edited by Burnsey
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Step pre 0 - Plan to just ride and enjoy the bike! 😄

 

Step 0

- Classy pipe! High pipe not really needed unless you are gonna go offroad.  But i like that pipe! I am going the cheaper polish pipe route.

 

Step 1

- Upgraded handguards are a must if you plan to do any offroad. I have Acerbis rally pro guards installed and have tested them out on many other bikes.  Acerbis fits and works great for me.

- i have never used or felt i needed axle sliders

- Crashbars. Lots of opinions out there. I trust german engineering and went with swmotech.

 

Step 2

- Skid plate is only needed if you will do rough offroad. I would wait on this. Ride a bit. See if you ever touch the plate. Upgrade if needed.

- Engine guards are not really needed unless you plan hard offroad.

- Stock clutch is smooth and easy. Camel kit is nice but not needed with stock clutch lever.

 

Step 3

- Stock seat feels fine to me.

- Luggage racks. I hate having soft luggage grind sand and mud into my bike, so usually run a rack.

- Radiator guard is not needed imo.

- Fork guards. Get em only after you break the stock guard.

 

Step 4

- See Step pre 0.

 

These are just my opinions based on 38 years of riding dual sports.

 

Edited by transalper
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45 minutes ago, transalper said:

Step pre 0 - Plan to just ride and enjoy the bike! 😄

 

Step 0

- Classy pipe! High pipe not really needed unless you are gonna go offroad.  But i like that pipe! I am going the cheaper polish pipe route.

 

Step 1

- Upgraded handguards are a must if you plan to do any offroad. I have Acerbis rally pro guards installed and have tested them out on many other bikes.  Acerbis fits and works great for me.

- i have never used or felt i needed axle sliders

- Crashbars. Lots of opinions out there. I trust german engineering and went with swmotech.

 

Step 2

- Skid plate is only needed if you will do rough offroad. I would wait on this. Ride a bit. See if you ever touch the plate. Upgrade if needed.

- Engine guards are not really needed unless you plan hard offroad.

- Stock clutch is smooth and easy. Camel kit is nice but not needed with stock clutch lever.

 

Step 3

- Stock seat feels fine to me.

- Luggage racks. I hate having soft luggage grind sand and mud into my bike, so usually run a rack.

- Radiator guard is not needed imo.

- Fork guards. Get em only after you break the stock guard.

 

Step 4

- See Step pre 0.

 

These are just my opinions based on 38 years of riding dual sports.

 

Step pre 0 is the best advice! You are completely right my friend 🙂

Thanks also for your opinion on those other parts. Helps me avoiding money traps for sure.

Edited by Tenerider
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Never start with step 0, first ride and find out what you really need.
Crashbars where something i did buy right away, I have a Motea upper and lower set but only mounted the upper. I think the lower will collide with the Adventure spec skidplate, i will dive in to that the first time a have to take down the skidplate but not sure if i need them after all.

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You might need an anti-bobble head as well.  And all the stuff that everyone else has added above me.

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19 hours ago, Landshark said:

You might need an anti-bobble head as well.  And all the stuff that everyone else has added above me.

That thing from Camel ADV which prevents the display from wobbling, right?

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1 hour ago, DuncMan said:

 

This does the exact same thing but is lighter and cheaper:
 

s-l400.jpg

High impact resistance. Water resistant. Strong chemical resistance.

 

 

To be fair to the Camel product, it fixes on three points and also stops the headlight wobble, not just the display.

 

MUCH better product, but yes, it's dearer.

Edited by Burnsey
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Thanks guys, already found the 3D files from @ClutchXT on thingiverse:

featured_preview_Short_Top_Clamp_v3.png

Designed this Anti-Bobble bracket for the Tenere 700, it also has the bolt spacing to accept a Ram Mount Adapter, adapter can be spaced to either side of the bracket or centered. there are 2 versions of the bracket in the...

 

Since I'm a huge fan of printing via shapeways, I might try this one as well. It's also not cheap, but their printing quality is second to none.

 

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These things are useless.
Look at this video (it will start at the right spot if i did it correct)


The leverage tot the point of the problem there is almost the same when you just connect the top and middle.

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4 hours ago, Tenerider said:

That thing from Camel ADV which prevents the display from wobbling, right?

That's what I was referring to but any device that stops the wiggle will do.  Wait till you ride without one and you'll know what we mean.  It's down right horrible.  

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Short update:

 

Finalised the order, here is my initial setup:

 

- Yamaha aluminum chain protector (simply for the looks guys :D)

- Acerbis X-Factory (note the "y") hand guards - they use steel bars, look a bit cooler than barkbusters imho, and they're cheaper.

- HP Corse SP-1 high/short exhaust

- Tail tidy with LED indicators (more or less required for the SP-1)

- Hepco & Becker center stand (relatively light, fits most skids, not too expensive). I guess the pros of a center stand will outweigh the cons for me.

- some axle sliders (I know guys, but come on, they were cheap, and have red little rings, and... well, I couldn't resist and do hope they'll keep some scratches off my fork and rear swingarm, at least on tarmac)

- OEM grip pads

- Bike (since all accessories wouldn't look good without it)

 

I'm gonna ride strictly onroad at first, so I'll add a skid (if necessary for my riding) later. Same for crash bars, probably.

 

Although it's not done regularly, it's possible to use your own bike in driving school / license test in Germany - if your insurance does cover training rides, and if it has at least 50 kW power, and if it's got at least 600ccm, and if it weighs at least 180 kg (probably dry). Yes, of course that's all regulated, we're in Germany!

I am not sure yet, but it may be that I'll be doing that, although I am a bit scared of dropping it 20 times during the first lesson, and killing the clutch and so on. But at least the Acerbis guards would probably save my levers.

Looking forward on your opinion 'bout this.

 

 

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32 minutes ago, Tenerider said:

 

 

Although it's not done regularly, it's possible to use your own bike in driving school / license test in Germany - if your insurance does cover training rides, and if it has at least 50 kW power, and if it's got at least 600ccm, and if it weighs at least 180 kg (probably dry). Yes, of course that's all regulated, we're in Germany!

I am not sure yet, but it may be that I'll be doing that, although I am a bit scared of dropping it 20 times during the first lesson, and killing the clutch and so on. But at least the Acerbis guards would probably save my levers.

Looking forward on your opinion 'bout this.

 

 

 

Acerbis are strong.

 

I thought they looked cooler too, but they don't accommodate aftermarket levers, so mine were swapped for BarkBusters.

 

OEM levers are about 9 quid, so buy a spare and take in your daypack.

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1 hour ago, Burnsey said:

 

Acerbis are strong.

 

I thought they looked cooler too, but they don't accommodate aftermarket levers, so mine were swapped for BarkBusters.

 

OEM levers are about 9 quid, so buy a spare and take in your daypack.

Acerbis works with adjustable Probrake levers.

IMG_20220101_110445396.jpg

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17 minutes ago, BikeBrother said:

Acerbis works with adjustable Probrake levers.

IMG_20220101_110445396.jpg

 

I should have said the Acerbis X-Factory - they certainly don't, due to a couple of plastic coated 'blocks' in the wrong place.

 

This is an old photo I found, to assist the return, but in the end I kept them as spares. This is with the blocks removed - the blocks attach the guard to the frame.

 

 

Unknown.jpeg

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10 minutes ago, BikeBrother said:

Ok, i have acerbis x-factor.

 

This is a better photo. Must be various styles?

 

The two blocks and the general lack of room makes options limited.

Screenshot 2022-01-17 at 19.26.49.png

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Thanks guys, might need to amend my order then! Really helpful.

X-Factor and X-Factory are different models, the latter seem narrower indeed (I ordered these).

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  • 3 weeks later...

Short update:

 

Last week, I finalized my order at my local dealer. Following upgrades will be installed by him (usually, I prefer to fiddle with such parts on my own, but I currently lack space and time):

1. Hepco & Becker center stand

This one looks nice and is lighter than the OEM side stand. AltRider would be even lighter, but availability is an issue (and price, too).

 

2.Hepco & Becker rally tankguard

I like its look and very good allround protection. Similar mounting points as Heed upper bars, same weight, but this one also features a crossbar below the radiator, which I like.

 

3. Acerbis X-Factor

Had my mind set on the X-FactorY first, but these (without Y) offer better compatibility with aftermarket clutch/brake levers - thanks @DuncMan, I finally decided to follow your advise 😄

 

Plus, I will install Camel ADVs anti-bobble head and upgraded sidestand spring once the bike arrives; as well as a Quadlock mounting system for my phone (instead of a "proper, but expensive" Zumo XT or Montana).

 

 

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  • 4 weeks later...

I'm in love 😍

 

20220302_164236.thumb.jpg.9070f55ff0a8455cae11668121f8ea68.jpg

 

Went to my dealer today to finalize everything - and there she was.

 

Started my riding lessons for my license two days ago (on a tiny SV650, it's way too small for me, ears between my knees almost). I will be using my Queen soon for the next lessons.

Funnily, my once favoured T7 Rally was also available, next to a blue 2022. Both look gorgeous, but actually I now prefer "Competition White". Looks even better with its red tail.

 

Edited by Tenerider
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Meanwhile in Germany...

 

Some parts have arrived already:

@Ktmmitch 's famous Rally Raid Products T7 spanner and nylon screws for them fork guards

Display protectors from Speedo Angels

@Camel ADV 's Anti Bobble Head and uprated sidestand spring

 

I've just pulled the trigger on a new rally seat for quite a fair price (330€ incl. shipping), usually it's something like 390-400€ over here.

I am not totally sure if I will need it - but having an 37" inseam, flatfooting should not be an issue an the added comfort sure will be welcome.

 

Bike is due at the end of this week. Can't wait swinging my leg over her (and probably laying her down a few moments later :D).

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She's here 😍

 

20220314_161608.thumb.jpg.98006dce07b8f15e5023d2c011652ff2.jpg20220314_163539.thumb.jpg.5405fc609a44dbd24865964c5839172b.jpg20220314_161622.thumb.jpg.a565dc5f636f054b03b49100691cefe6.jpg

 

Acerbis X-Factors and OEM knee pads are still on backorder.

 

My first ride was overwhelming. Very nice and tame engine, unless you kick her a little bit. Since I'm a total beginner, this is very welcome.

 

Gotta get used to her slow speed handling, but it's better than expected. Flat footing no problem for me.

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  • Tenerider changed the title to Tenerider's T7

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