Jump to content
Yamaha Tenere 700 Forum
prwatts

T7 Suspension

Recommended Posts

prwatts

It's fully adjustable.

I found my new T7 harsh and juddery.

 

What say you fellows ???

 

All the settings were "harder" than the manual sez.

 

I turned everything down >2 clicks softer than standard and now I have a much smoother rider - maybe I won't got round the 'Ring quite so fast, but I don't want to be the first to put his T7 on the Nordscheife ...

 

Peter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
NickT7
12 hours ago, prwatts said:

It's fully adjustable.

I found my new T7 harsh and juddery.

 

What say you fellows ???

 

All the settings were "harder" than the manual sez.

 

I turned everything down >2 clicks softer than standard and now I have a much smoother rider - maybe I won't got round the 'Ring quite so fast, but I don't want to be the first to put his T7 on the Nordscheife ...

 

Peter

Hello Peter, I picked up my t7 yesterday and I also think that the suspension is adjusted very hard.  My dealer could not yet provide the user manual because he did not have it yet.  So I can't see what the default setting is.  Online I have not seen a user manual for the t7.  Maybe I should also take the suspension two steps back.  Nick (Netherlands) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
norcal616

Known that Yamaha uses #120 teenage test riders, the greater majority are near double the test riders weight 🙃

 

I would expect the settings to be a bit harsh on the streets as maybe Yamaha choose settings to suit OFF ROAD more than street... 

 

I think the owners need to think where is my bike gonna spend a lot of time running around...the suspension will not cover every riding surface with one setting... 

 

Turning the clickers inward is "Harder/slower" ...turning clickers outward is "softer/faster"

Edited by norcal616

2012-WR250F...2015-FZ-07(Hordpower edition 80whp)...2015- FJ-09 Graves Exhaust Woolich Tune/Kit 120whp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
NickT7

Thanks for the quick response.  I will try to put something to the suspension.  I had heard that he would have an optimal adjustment from the factory, both on-road and off-road.🤔

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
norcal616

You can always get a piece of tape and record the settings you have now so you have a point to go back and reset and place it near the suspension/fork tube and Set your sag... carry a note book and screwdriver... 

 

Make one adjustment like fork rebound at a time, it also helps sometimes to go past the setting you just tried to verify is worse/better.. put that setting back to original...then try a different adjustment like fork compression and repeat...Try each adjustment across a wide range of surfaces vs just riding around the block...

 

 

 

Even fork height, the RPMs you keep the engine at, riding styles,tires, extra luggage, etc all have an impact on suspension behavior... 

 

This will give you a mental picture of what the suspension behavior is and give you an idea how to adjust your suspension to achieve the control you want...

  • Like 2

2012-WR250F...2015-FZ-07(Hordpower edition 80whp)...2015- FJ-09 Graves Exhaust Woolich Tune/Kit 120whp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
prwatts
1 hour ago, NickT7 said:

Hello Peter, I picked up my t7 yesterday and I also think that the suspension is adjusted very hard.  My dealer could not yet provide the user manual because he did not have it yet.  So I can't see what the default setting is.  Online I have not seen a user manual for the t7.  Maybe I should also take the suspension two steps back.  Nick (Netherlands) 

Hallo Nick

 

Try this and see what you think:, turn the compression adjuster 6 clicks anticlockwise (softer)

 

Rear Shock Rebound (Base of the shock)  Turn anticlockwise 4 clicks

Rear Shock Compression (Top of the shock) Turn anticlockwise 5 clicks.

 

Front Rebound (top of forks):

Standard 17 clicks out

Delivered 15 clicks out (harder)

I set it to 20 clicks out

 

Front Compression (Base of forks, under a rubber plug you just dig out)

Standard 11 clicks out

Delivered 9 clicks out (harder)

I set it to 15 clicks out

 

To do this, you lie on the lounge floor carpet under the forks (I assume you are keeping the bike in the lounge for now 🙂 )

Seriously - lie down on the floor, look under the bottom of the shock. dig out the rubber stopper that keeps the dirt off the adjuster

 

 

Rear Shock Rebound (Base of Mono-Shock)

Standard 13 clicks out

Delivered 12 clicks out (Harder)

I set it to 16 clicks out

 

Rear Shock Compression Mono-Shock

Standard 15 clicks out

Delivered 11 clicks out (much harder)

I set it to 16 clicks out

 

Peter

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
NickT7
9 hours ago, norcal616 said:

You can always get a piece of tape and record the settings you have now so you have a point to go back and reset and place it near the suspension/fork tube and Set your sag... carry a note book and screwdriver... 

 

Make one adjustment like fork rebound at a time, it also helps sometimes to go past the setting you just tried to verify is worse/better.. put that setting back to original...then try a different adjustment like fork compression and repeat...Try each adjustment across a wide range of surfaces vs just riding around the block...

 

 

 

Even fork height, the RPMs you keep the engine at, riding styles,tires, extra luggage, etc all have an impact on suspension behavior... 

 

This will give you a mental picture of what the suspension behavior is and give you an idea how to adjust your suspension to achieve the control you want...

Thank you for thinking along.  I will write down the basic settings, that way I can always go back to the factory settings.  For the road and especially in the corners, the hard suspension drives perfectly but he passes all bumps very fast.  I'm going to work with it.  To be continued

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
NickT7
9 hours ago, prwatts said:

Hallo Nick

 

Try this and see what you think:, turn the compression adjuster 6 clicks anticlockwise (softer)

 

Rear Shock Rebound (Base of the shock)  Turn anticlockwise 4 clicks

Rear Shock Compression (Top of the shock) Turn anticlockwise 5 clicks.

 

Front Rebound (top of forks):

Standard 17 clicks out

Delivered 15 clicks out (harder)

I set it to 20 clicks out

 

Front Compression (Base of forks, under a rubber plug you just dig out)

Standard 11 clicks out

Delivered 9 clicks out (harder)

I set it to 15 clicks out

 

To do this, you lie on the lounge floor carpet under the forks (I assume you are keeping the bike in the lounge for now 🙂 )

Seriously - lie down on the floor, look under the bottom of the shock. dig out the rubber stopper that keeps the dirt off the adjuster

 

 

Rear Shock Rebound (Base of Mono-Shock)

Standard 13 clicks out

Delivered 12 clicks out (Harder)

I set it to 16 clicks out

 

Rear Shock Compression Mono-Shock

Standard 15 clicks out

Delivered 11 clicks out (much harder)

I set it to 16 clicks out

 

Peter

Thank you for the clear explanation.  As soon as I have the time I will start using it and try your settings.  Near where I live is also the hyperpro company that had offered to look at the basic settings and maybe adjust something.  Maybe I'll do that if I really can't work it out.  Thanks again for thinking along and the answers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
prwatts

Nick, please tell us what suspension settings you use, when you have done it.  🙂

I am still not 100% happy with mine

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
prwatts

Today I did a test with the front suspension compression damping fully soft as per the Manual.

 

The ride was ok.  High speed damping is still hard.  I think the suspension is designed for a quite-loaded bike.

 

My rear preload came from the factory as per the Manual: Turn turns IN  (Full Hard is 24!)  and I weigh 96kg + maybe 8 kg riding gear.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
New Order

I have tinkered with the settings and have got my Tenere 700 pretty softened up. Settings as follows. My weight with gear are approximately 90 kg. Rear I have just set the spring preload on the softest setting. Nothing else is touched. In front I have the compression damping 4 clicks from the softest and rebound 13 klicks from the softest. Now it is much better. It actually is rather comfortable.  But I have to test it out more on gravel first.

Edited by New Order

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
prwatts

@ New Order and I have been experimenting with the Suspension

 

He is 90kg incl riding Gear,  I am about 100kg with riding gear/.

 

We have both set our suspension as follows and are reasonably happy with it:

 

Front: Rebound = 18 clicks out;  Compression = 4 clicks in from softest

 

Rear:  Rebound  = Standard as per manual;  Compression = softest

 

Rear Preload  = Standard (10 clicks in)

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
NickT7

Thanks for this information.  I am also around 85 kg including motorcycle clothing.  I can also try the settings that you use.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cexley

I agree.  My new T7, and its punishing seat, feels more like a fast road bike set up, than any dual purpose adventure bike.  The ride on my original Tenere 3AJ is like a Rolls Royce in comparison.   I have 2 stroke road race bikes with more compliant suspension.

 

I have a manual in French (still waiting for an English version), which shows the standard settings for front and rear if anyone wants them.  Like you guys, when I checked my T7, none of them were set to 'standard' from the factory. 

 

The main thing to do BEFORE you play with any compression and rebound damping is to set your preload sag settings correctly for your weight, which is basically getting the correct ride height and balance between front and rear pre-load settings.  There are loads of YouTube clips covering how to set sag.  Basically, you need to set the ride height between 25-30% of the available travel for an adventure bike.  Our T7's travel is 210mm front and 200mm rear, so that roughly 50-60mm total sag with you in your gear and usual riding position.  You usually need a mate with a tape measure to do this with you sat on the bike.  Once this is set, you can move onto the damping.  If you don't set the sag first, you will be chasing settings all over the place for ever more.  If that happens, go back to the base factory settings and start again. Correct suspension set up is a is a bit of a black art, so I hope this helps with the basics.

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
GPSAT

For me, I set the sag and "ball park" set the compression and dampening, then I pocket the required tools and spend an afternoon riding various terrain tweaking as I go. Suspension tools are always in my tool roll anyway. Had the rear wheel bounce over my head coming off a woop when I was young. Know your bike and suspension... It saves much healing time.

  • Like 3

James 2021 Tenere 700 - Black

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Timo
On 9/23/2019 at 5:43 PM, Cexley said:

I agree.  My new T7, and its punishing seat, feels more like a fast road bike set up, than any dual purpose adventure bike.  The ride on my original Tenere 3AJ is like a Rolls Royce in comparison.   I have 2 stroke road race bikes with more compliant suspension.

 

I have a manual in French (still waiting for an English version), which shows the standard settings for front and rear if anyone wants them.  Like you guys, when I checked my T7, none of them were set to 'standard' from the factory. 

 

The main thing to do BEFORE you play with any compression and rebound damping is to set your preload sag settings correctly for your weight, which is basically getting the correct ride height and balance between front and rear pre-load settings.  There are loads of YouTube clips covering how to set sag.  Basically, you need to set the ride height between 25-30% of the available travel for an adventure bike.  Our T7's travel is 210mm front and 200mm rear, so that roughly 50-60mm total sag with you in your gear and usual riding position.  You usually need a mate with a tape measure to do this with you sat on the bike.  Once this is set, you can move onto the damping.  If you don't set the sag first, you will be chasing settings all over the place for ever more.  If that happens, go back to the base factory settings and start again. Correct suspension set up is a is a bit of a black art, so I hope this helps with the basics.

You are correct. However for my 90kg incl gear, I have to use max preload to come to just over 6cm sag (just over 30%). Interestingly the static sag (without rider) is still 2,5cm. Optimal would be 10% or 2cm. 
Conclusion: the spring is about right for my weight, but the preload travel is a bit short. (?) Bit weird...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cexley

Intresting. I'm also 90kg in my gear and I only increased preload on the rear shock by 3 clicks to get the correct sag.  However, I've spent a lot of time trying to get the front and rear compression and rebound damping right.  I get my English owners manual next Wed, so I'll update this with my settings against standard which may help as we are a similar weight. My current manual is in French, so can't be certain what all the stock settings are as they seem to be a mix of clockwise and anti clockwise.  So far, I've been adjusting everything purely by feel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hombacher

 

Just scroll upwards, @prwatts did already a good job in a detailed write up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Murska
13 hours ago, Timo said:

You are correct. However for my 90kg incl gear, I have to use max preload to come to just over 6cm sag (just over 30%). Interestingly the static sag (without rider) is still 2,5cm. Optimal would be 10% or 2cm. 
Conclusion: the spring is about right for my weight, but the preload travel is a bit short. (?) Bit weird...

+1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ales

I found the rear suspension on t7 quite soft and front quite hard...

So i went + 5 clicks in all 3 positions on rear suspension and -5 on 2 posituons in front suspension.

It completly transformed the bike's behavior in offroad riding..now i can feel both ends of the bike working together as one..

Sure it could be better if i threw 1500euros in suspensions , but for a stock suspension this is a really good product.

I am 100kg in riding gear

Fast and hard offroad driving is my style

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sandijs
22 hours ago, Ales said:

I found the rear suspension on t7 quite soft and front quite hard...

So i went + 5 clicks in all 3 positions on rear suspension and -5 on 2 posituons in front suspension.

It completly transformed the bike's behavior in offroad riding..now i can feel both ends of the bike working together as one..

Sure it could be better if i threw 1500euros in suspensions , but for a stock suspension this is a really good product.

I am 100kg in riding gear

Fast and hard offroad driving is my style

I suggest you to try heavier rear spring! It's relatively inexpensive upgrade, but it will again transform your bike! Especially with your weight category!

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ktmmitch

Anyone thinking of adjusting clickers etc, should get the SAG set correctly, that is the first thing to do on any suspension, then once sag is correct, the clickers can work correctly.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.