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Tazmool

Tubeless rim options for the Tenere?

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Tazmool

Hello Everyone, 

 

With out getting into the pros and cons of tubeless vs tubed...

What options (if any) are there for tubeless rims on the Tenere? 

I understand there is a tubliss system you can try and install, 
Are there any aftermarket tubeless rims for the Tenere 700?  

 

Thanks
Tazmool

 

 

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erey

You could do it yourself

 

http://www2s.biglobe.ne.jp/~outex/

 

or use a company

 

https://www.bartfactory.com/products/bartubeless-en/yat700-yamaha-tenere-700-en/?lang=en

 

for example in Europe.

 

Africa Twin owners did it already.

 

The main problem is the front wheel - not coming with a rim (anti-debeding).

 

I will use the Bartfactory solution in January.

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Murska

The front rim must be replaced if you want tubeless, oem not hump on the rim. The rear rim is hump.

I had to do a tubeless conversion 3M N4412 tape but first I had to replace my front rim.

 

image.png.004816289f4332f0473735a3f2d70350.png

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NickT7

Hello, just another question.  I am looking for the right inner tube size for my rear wheel and I cannot find the right size on the internet for 150/70 R18.  Do you know what standard inner tube is in the rear wheel?  thanks in advance! 

 

Nick

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slawmir

I don't know the standard size, but before I went for three days trip in September, I bought Michelin Airstop MGR 140/80  R18 spare tube just in case of puncture.

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Yammybound88

I am interested in following this thread - to me the biggest thing that holds me back on solo journeys is having to go through repairing a puncture in a tube instead of inserting a plug and being on my way.

 

Merry Christmas everyone

Cheers

-Bob

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WalterT
44 minutes ago, Yammybound88 said:

I am interested in following this thread - to me the biggest thing that holds me back on solo journeys is having to go through repairing a puncture in a tube instead of inserting a plug and being on my way.

 

Merry Christmas everyone

Cheers

-Bob

Very familiar feeling. Tubes have more advantages imo, especially on a solo journey in the stigs. Never replaced or fixed a tire by myself yet however. I'm trying to get an old rim and tire to practice on. Confidence and experience are the limiting factors.

 

Admin: if this is too off-topic, just step in.

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NickT7
6 hours ago, slawmir said:

I don't know the standard size, but before I went for three days trip in September, I bought Michelin Airstop MGR 140/80  R18 spare tube just in case of puncture.

Thanks for the quick response.  The only inner tubes that I can find are indeed 140/80 R18 wide and not 150. I don't know if this is possible for the rear wheel?

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slawmir
15 hours ago, NickT7 said:

Thanks for the quick response.  The only inner tubes that I can find are indeed 140/80 R18 wide and not 150. I don't know if this is possible for the rear wheel?

I think that 150/70 R18 tire is similar in overall size to the 140/80 R18 (140 is narrower and taller, 150 is wider and lower). So, 140/80 R18 tube should fit for the rear wheel, but I might be wrong.

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al700

Rally raid offer 3 different rim sizes for tubeless conversion...check out the link.

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GPSAT

140/80-18 tube is what you use. I use the heavy duty tube  as the primary and carry a normal thickness tube as the spare as it takes way less room for packing. I have changed many tubes during adventures and in many unpleasant  conditions. 

Once I get my preordered bike in June 2020, I'll post my personal setup.

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James 2021 Tenere 700 - Black

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NickT7
4 hours ago, GPSAT said:

140/80-18 tube is what you use. I use the heavy duty tube  as the primary and carry a normal thickness tube as the spare as it takes way less room for packing. I have changed many tubes during adventures and in many unpleasant  conditions. 

Once I get my preordered bike in June 2020, I'll post my personal setup.

Perfect, thanks then I will order that size inner tube!

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cabby

I converted the rear on my AT with 3M tape and 3M sealant, took a couple attempts to get it right but once done that was it, will eventually get round to doing the same on my T7 

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MGG

I think that tubeliss in front and converted tubeless in back would be fine.

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ADVUSA
On 12/25/2019 at 10:15 AM, WalterT said:

Very familiar feeling. Tubes have more advantages imo, especially on a solo journey in the stigs. Never replaced or fixed a tire by myself yet however. I'm trying to get an old rim and tire to practice on. Confidence and experience are the limiting factors.

 

Admin: if this is too off-topic, just step in.

 

Can you elaborate on your opinion as to why tubes have more advantages, "especially on solo journeys in the stigs"  Please.

I'm interested in hearing, Thanks !

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WalterT
Posted (edited)

Sure! On normal European or US tarmac, a puncture will most likely be caused by a sharp object. For this kind of problem  tubeless tires with the small repair sets are by far the easiest. The slime solutions seem to work well in YouTube experiments, but I'm sceptical on independence of some of these.

 

On rough terrain and long journeys where help is not readily available the cause is more likely a sharp rock, or a tire wearing out (because you haven't run into a proper town for the last 700km after thinking "my tires have really wear quickly"..) that causes a puncture or a rip in the tire. These types of holes are less easy or even impossible to plug. A bent, no longer sealing rim can also be the end of the road. In all those cases a tube is fixable. I've seen people patching up ripped tires with cardboard and Duck tape and keep rolling until the next town.

 

Tubes do have their down sides: when running on lower pressure there is the chance of a pinch flat, and fixing a simple nail puncture is a LOT more hassle - especially if you go out alone. I personally have done it once, but this was with a lot of help from three others who had experience with this. It's a skill which I want to develop.

 

For me it's the feeling that tubes always give me repair/botch/mcguyver options vs a tubeless tire which apart from small puncture is effectively unrepairable. 

 

Just my 2 cents.

Edited by WalterT
Bloody autocorrection...
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ADVUSA
58 minutes ago, WalterT said:

Sure! On normal European or US tarmac, a puncture will most likely be caused by a sharp object. For this kind of problem  tubeless tires with the small repair sets are by far the easiest. The slime solutions seem to work well in YouTube experiments, but I'm sceptical on independence of some of these.

 

On rough terrain and long journeys where help is not readily available the cause is more likely a sharp rock, or a tire wearing out (because you haven't run into a proper town for the last 700km after thinking "my tires have really wear quickly"..) that causes a puncture or a rip in the tire. These types of holes are less easy or even impossible to plug. A bent, no longer sealing rim can also be the end of the road. In all those cases a tube is fixable. I've seen people patching up ripped tires with cardboard and Duck tape and keep rolling until the next town.

 

Tubes do have their down sides: when running on lower pressure there is the chance of a pinch flat, and fixing a simple nail puncture is a LOT more hassle - especially if you go out alone. I personally have done it once, but this was with a lot of help from three others who had experience with this. It's a skill which I want to develop.

 

For me it's the feeling that tubes always give me repair/botch/mcguyver options vs a tubeless tire which apart from small puncture is effectively unrepairable. 

 

Just my 2 cents.

Thanks for sharing that perfect explanation.

Slime repairs come with some risk for sure of not working, it also creates a mess when you have to repair the flat correctly.

Tubeless on rare occasions could mean the 'end of the road' as you say.

With Tubed, you'll work a lot more, but if your prepared, you can always get moving.

 

 

 

TENERE_POST_PIC.jpg

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X Plane

Tubeless rims options look interesting but a lot of £, work etc as spoke wheel building is specialist.

 

Me, I’ll be: Fitting thicker Heavy Duty off-road tubes;

 

Not running under 18 PSI for all terrains to avoid compression nips and going over 25 PSI for roads.

 

Carrying: standard thin tube along with tools, tube repair kit and a 12V air compressor on trips.

 

Tubed tires are lighter, flex better and therefor grip more easy are are easier to buy anywhere and grand on a middle weight Adventure Bike

 

Different folks, different environments, different skills, difference wishes & needs = the variety here.

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Tazmool

Maybe I'm wrong, but I always thought that if you have a tubeless rim and tubeless tire, and suffer damage to the tire that cannot be easily repaired, you could always slip a tube in there and be on your way?   (ie use a tube in a tubeless setup to get you to the next town/shop and repair the tire there)  

So, running a tubeless setup with a set of spare tubes for the worst scenarios is the best of both worlds?  

Tazmool

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Jason
On 1/2/2020 at 1:26 AM, Tazmool said:

Maybe I'm wrong, but I always thought that if you have a tubeless rim and tubeless tire, and suffer damage to the tire that cannot be easily repaired, you could always slip a tube in there and be on your way?   (ie use a tube in a tubeless setup to get you to the next town/shop and repair the tire there)  

So, running a tubeless setup with a set of spare tubes for the worst scenarios is the best of both worlds?  

Tazmool

I would have said this too. I compete in an awful lot of mountain biking, enduro type stuff. My wheels are setup tubeless and I always Carry plugs and then have a tube strapped to the bike for any damage that is not sealing. 
 

I suppose the thing here is to decide if the initial outlay for tubeless is worth it for you as an individual

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Alf Meister

If you get a puncture, like a nail or a screw, and plug kit will most likely get you on your way pretty quickly (I know, I’ve had 2 punctures in the last year, one large screw and a small nail, both repaired and rideable in about 15 mins of discovering it). 

 

You can also carry a tube and stick it in a tubeless tyre to get you moving if you ding a rim or cut a tyre, but a puncture  with a tubed tyre is a PIA imho and a puncture with a tubed tyre is normally a quick deflation as the air can escape out through the spoke nipples where as a tubeless puncture is generally a slow deflation As air can only leak from what caused the puncture. 

 

When I get my T7 I’ll be doing an OutEx conversion as soon as I can. Apparently there are 21”x 2.15” front rims with the safety ridge, so I’ll probably buy one for peace of mind. 

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29er

I had been interested in sealing my rims but had never really looked at what the Outex kit contained, so watched the Outex video and i don't see the value in it, thats not to say it doesn't work ..... but it's just tape, good tape admitted.... but What 3M don't know about tape isn't worth knowing, i can't see why a specialist 3M tape will not do just a good a job and at less than half the price. This one below seals over rivets, and you could put a narrower 3M double sided VHB air sealing tape on first to cover the spokes and this wider one over the top of the double sided one. I'm going to do my rear wheel at the very least and will be looking at 3M tapes instead. You could buy two rolls of tape - double sided VHB with this wider one as a top layer for £80 and have enough left to do another few sets of wheels!! these tapes are all weather and temp stable so thats not an issue either, and bear in mind that 3M make a lot of tapes for the auto industry. Just my opinion... nothing against Outex aside of the value for money, i have never used it. When i get it done in the next month or so i'll post an update.

 

https://www.3m.co.uk/3M/en_GB/company-uk/3m-products/~/3M-Extreme-Sealing-Tape-4412/?N=5002385+3293241577&rt=rud

 

VHB Guide to tapes.

4932vhbtape-220x160.jpg

The comprehensive guide to VHB, very high bonding tape produced by 3M. As a 3M premier distributor we are able to provide the most suitable VHB tape.

 

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FredBasset
On 12/25/2019 at 12:28 PM, Murska said:

The front rim must be replaced if you want tubeless, oem not hump on the rim. The rear rim is hump.

I had to do a tubeless conversion 3M N4412 tape but first I had to replace my front rim.

 

image.png.004816289f4332f0473735a3f2d70350.png

 

Hi Murska, what manufacture is that new rim and where did you buy it from? Cheers

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roy826

Had my first flat on the T7 yesterday. About 6 miles from my house and I was riding with a friend so he doubled me back to my house and I got my truck and trailer and went back to pick up the T7. Pulled the rear wheel at my house and slapped a new tube in the rear and shes good to go. It was an old piece of metal that once was a weird type nail. I felt it when I hit it, never saw it in the roadway. Tire was completely flat about a mile after hitting it.

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